1.4 Assignment: Sphere of Control Inventory Getting Started The control that we

1.4 Assignment: Sphere of Control Inventory
Getting Started
The control that we exercise over our own life often (but not always) is directly linked to our conscious choices. Crittenden (2021) asserted that “Control = Awareness + Choice.” Based on that, one typically may only exert control over their way of being when they are cognizant or aware. Since people tend to be creatures of habit, actions often result without conscious decisions. Such behavior is considered to be out of one’s direct control. This applies not only to physical actions one may take but how one interprets what they observe in the world around them. We learn from this that the greater one’s capacity for self-awareness, the greater one’s capacity will be to exert control over how one thinks and behaves.
As an example, we may develop an awareness that we have formed a habit, such as eating certain unhealthy foods (who doesn’t like French fries, right?). We may decide that we should change our habit but find it difficult to do so. Awareness of our choices, however, provides an opportunity to create new and more useful habits. Doing so may result in greater alignment for ourselves, leading to a greater sense of authenticity (Crittenden, 2021).
Crittenden (2021) goes on to explain that “given human beings are social beings, an individual is able to impact on their ‘Circle of Concern’ through others. This is their ‘Circle of Influence’ and is related to the quality of their relationships and the quality of the conversations that happen within those relationships. It speaks to our capacity to build our authority with others and gain substantive promises from them. The bigger the promises we can gain from others, the bigger the impact on our ‘Circle of Concern.’”
An image illustrating these three circles and providing further explanation can be found on the webpage The Circles of Control, Influence, and Concern(new tab).
Upon successful completion of this assignment, you will be able to:
Explain how “sphere of control” affects the ways in which you lead as well as the way in which you follow others.
Assess how your understanding of the control you possess and implement informs your self-identity as well as the way others perceive you. 
Instructions
Review the rubric to make sure you understand the criteria for earning your grade.
Read Chapter 13 in the Middlebrooks text, Discovering Leadership. (You first used this text in your LDR-220 course, the second course in the BSOL program.)
Complete the Spheres of Control Scale (SOC-3)(new tab). The estimated time for completion is about five minutes.
Write a reflection paper that reports your SOC-3 score, then discuss how your “sphere of control” affects the way you lead as well as the way you follow others. Provide one or more examples from your own workplace or in some other organizational context in which you are involved. Consider how your understanding of the control you both possess and implement informs your self-identity as well as the way others perceive you. What are the implications of this for your role as a leader? Your assignment should take the form of a two-page reflection paper (500-600 words in a Word document).
In addition to course materials, your paper must include at least two additional sources outside of those included in this course’s syllabus.
Be sure to consider the implications of your reflections as they apply to the role of leader, either your own experiences as a leader or even as a follower.
Inasmuch as this is a reflection paper, first-person voice is acceptable.