34 [Department] 32 [Department] Department Relocation Phase 1 Prime Brokage A Plan

34
[Department]
32
[Department]
Department Relocation Phase 1
Prime Brokage
A Plan that will condense OUR Prime Brokage Team together in one footprint for the America’s
[Placeholder: this is normally where an executive summary would be featured.]
[Prime Brokage Department]
[GUIDANCE – EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Executive summaries are exactly what they imply, a brief description of the project that a busy executive may read to understand the purpose, main points, and deliverables of a project. They are tailored so upper management understands how the project fits into the mission and goals of the organization.
Unlike the aforementioned templates in this document the executive summary is known for its brevity. However, the importance of this template is to be able to recognize and report the most important things the executives need to know so there are no “surprises” during the project run.]
Table of Contents
Executive Summary Error! Bookmark not defined.
Version Control 3
Project Charter 4
Risk Identification Questions 5
Technical Risks 5
Management Risks 8
Commercial Risks 11
External Risks 12
SWOT Analysis (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, & Threats) 14
Known Project Risks, Constraints, & Assumptions 14
Roles and Responsibilities: 14
Team Contract 16
Project Scope 20
In scope 20
Out of scope 20
Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 22
Risk Breakdown Structure (RBS) 25
Budget 26
Communications Matrix 27
Stakeholder Communications Analysis 27
Glossary [Description of Glossary] 28
RACI Matrix 28
Risk Matrix 29
Risk Stakeholder Roles and Responsibilities 31
Risk Management Process and Activities 32
Project Schedule 33
References 34
Appendices 35
Version Control
[Description of Version Control]
Version Number
Assignment
Date
1.0
Unit 1
[GUIDANCE – VERSION CONTROL: Any change should be documented. For example if I (the instructor) send this document back to you for revisions, the revision should be number and dated. So if I send it back to a learner after the learner submits this template the first time, it should have a second row of 1.1, Unit 1, date of submission.]
Project Charter
Need to create additional space on the 3fl of 383 Madison to contain the expansion of our Prime Brokage team. Today they expand across 3 floors in 2 different buildings. Our goal is to have the entire team on one floor in and in one building.
[GUIDANCE – PROJECT CHARTER:
Phase 1 Prime Brokerage Department consolidation. We will create an additional 47 seats on the left wing of the 3rd floor at 383 Madison. Yvette Armstrong will be the PM in charge of the project from start to completion. She will utilize various named resources in house and out sourced to create the entire project team. Names of the team leads will be announces within 2 weeks as the interview process is still underway. A budget has been set at 1.6M, given a timeline of 6 months for completion.
Project Title: Department relocation Phase 1.
Project Start Date: May 20, 2022 Project Finish Date: November 30,2022
Budget: 1.6M
Project Manager: Yvette Armstrong
Project Objectives: By November 2022, Our Prime Brokerage Team will be consolidated on the 3rd floor of 383 Madison in the right wing corner. We will condense current 103 cubicles to create 150 trading style desk with monitor stacking capability. Every Friday, they’re going to give us an update report on what they’ve accomplished and what they still have left to complete. We’re allotting them a budget of $1.6 for completion of the project.
Approach: Purchase orders & Meetings
New ergonomic Monitors, PC’s Keyboards & Mice equipment will be purchased
Trading desk furniture will be made to order based on the size specifications
Network infostructure will be expanded
Various in house moves will need to done to clear up space.
Weekly meetings will be done with respective teams as well as shareholders.
Risk Identification Questions
[Description Risk Identification Questions]
[GUIDANCE – RISKS IDENTIFICATON QUESTIONS:
Risk identification reveals possible events that may have impact on the project within the organization or from external sources. This series of questions gives the project manager a standard checklist to ask questions of herself/himself, the project team members, management, users, and stakeholders. (Hillson & Simon, pp. 205–210; Hillson, p. 33; Pcubed).]
RBS ID
Question
Answer
Mitigation
Assigned
Examples Preliminary Action
Technical Risks
1.1 Scope Definition
Scope of the project and the duration of the project have been clearly defined?
yes
Y Armstrong / Kearney
Do we have the bandwidth to support the additional 47 users
Relocate 97 users out of west wing area
Dismantle 103 cubicles and throw out.
Beef up Land Wan for additional network connections
Order 150 Dell opitplex 390 Micro pc’s with Dell ultra slim multi stackable monitors & dual monitors arms.
Relocate 150 user onto 3rd floor
1.2
Requirements
Definition
Project deliverables or requirements been clearly identified?
yes
M Armstrong/ Pauling / Christopher
Consolidate Prime Brokerage Team onto one floor within 383 Madison Ave
Create an additional 47 seats on 3rd floor
Remove 103 current cubical and replace with platform style trading desk
Purchase new technology equipment to support desk setup..
1.3
Estimates, Assumptions & Constraints
Have all estimates, assumptions, and constraints been vetted?
No
Felder / Whaley / Valdez / Mexicana
Man power need to complete 147 user survey
Cost for new equipment
Timeline adjustments
1.4
Technical Processes
Are the current support facilities and infrastructure sufficient for succcompletion of the projessful ect?
TBD
Felder / Valdez/ Whaley
Design new floor plan
Order and purchase trading desk layout
Update current infostructure in data center for additional user traffic / support
Survey 97 users current desk setup to relocate
Survey 150 users current setup for new buildout
Place order for new equipment
Setup user testing plan.
Create new floor plans.
1.5
Technology
Will current IT systems support or integrate with this project?
No
Whaley / Valdez
New technology may be developed during project lifetime.
Technology changes may invalidate design.
Technology not updated to current version.
Legacy technology in use
1.6
Technical Interfaces
Do other projects or systems depend on this project?
NO
Y Armstrong
Standalone space available for both relocation
1.7
Design
Is the design aligned with the requirements, constraints, and assumptions?
YES
Y Armstrong
Design had been received and pending approve on space size
1.8
Performance
Will the project deliverables meet performance requirements?
YES
Y Armstrong
Infostructure and Technology specs meet guidelines.
1.9
Reliability & Maintainability
How stable with the solution be and is it easily maintainable?
YES
Mexicana, Whaley, Reynolds
Target reliability criteria may be unattainable with chosen solution.
The use of innovative technology may improve or degrade reliability.
Maintainability requirements may impose unacceptable design constraints.
1.10
Safety
Is the solution within safety guidelines?
TBD
Felder
Specs need to be followed to avoid upcoming issues.
Changes in safety regulations may require significant redesign.
1.11
Security
Will the new system or product keep information secure?
YES
Valdez
Design is industry standard.
Will continue to maintain Government regulations during project.
Current infrastructure will be removed and distroyed.
1.12
Test and Acceptance
Is there a standardized test regimen in place?
TBD
Whaley, Reynolds, Mexicana
User acceptance testing (UAT) will be conducted throughout buildout.
Test is will be conducted up to go live date
Management Risks
2.1
Project Management
Is the discipline of project management part of the organization?
Yes
Y Armstrong
Project management systems may not be adequate to support project requirements.
Poor decision-making may result in inappropriate task allocation.
Adoption of best practice risk process may improve project performance.
Is project management standardized?
Are “best practices” documented and implemented in subsequent project?
2.1.1Project Manager
Has a full-time project manager been identified?
Yes
Y Armstrong
Is there a pool of trained project managers?
Will the project manager be an outside contractor?
Has the project manager worked for the organization on past projects?
2.1.2
Project Manager
Does the project manager have knowledge of both the business and project scope?
Yes
Y Armstrong
Does the project manager have a track record with the organization?
Does the project manager have experience with the departments within the organization?
2.1.3
Project Team
Have the project team and their responsibilities been clearly defined and accepted?
Yes
Y Armstrong
Have team members worked with the project manager in the past?
Have team members worked on a project before?
2.1.4
Project Sponsor
Has a corporate project sponsor been identified?
Yes
M Armstrong
Has the sponsor have a track record with the organization?
2.1.5
Project Manager/Sponsor
Is there a good working relationship between the corporate project sponsor and project manager?
Yes
Y Armstrong / M Armstrong
Has the sponsor worked with the project manager?
What type of relationship? Egalitarian? Manager Direct Report?
2.2
Program/Portfolio Management
Does the project have a high priority to get completed?
Yes
Y Armstrong / M Armstrong
Project may be given inappropriate priority within the program.
Other projects may divert key resources.
Other projects may be cancelled and release resources.
2.2.1Project Repository
Is historical information available for project estimates?
No
N/A
Has this kind of project been done before?
2.3
Operations Management
Will this project impact upon the day-to-day operations of the organization?
No
N/A
Design may expose weaknesses in existing products or processes.
Business-as-usual demands may reduce project funding or contingency.
2.4
Organization
Is the organization’s management structure and processes stable?
Yes
M Armstrong
Reorganization may impact project organization (negatively or positively).
Changes in corporate structure may affect project (negatively or positively).
2.4.1
Executive Management
Does execute management support the project?
Yes
M Armstrong
Is there a keen interest in the project succeeding?
2.4.2
Organization Structure
Is your organization’s current structure adequate to support this initiative?
Yes
M Armstrong
Is the management structure aligned for a “projectized” solution?
2.4.3
Organizational Morale
Does the organization have excellent employee morale?
Yes
M Armstrong
Is there general support for the mission and goals of the organization?
Has there been labor unrest?
2.4.4
Operational Managers
Have all managers for the project been designated?
Yes
M Armstrong
Is it clear who will be supplying human resources to the project?
2.4.5
Organizational
Departments
Have all conflicting organizational objectives been identified and resolved?
NO
M Armstrong
Are there other projects that may be attempting the same outcomes?
Are there other projects that may be attempting other outcomes?
2.4.6
Project & Operational Managers
Have management authority and responsibilities been clearly defined and accepted?
Yes
M Armstrong
Is there commitment from department managers for the project?
Are there competing interests between managers?
2.5
Resourcing
Is there appropriate skillsets available for the project?
Yes
M Armstrong
Key resources may be unavailable when required.
Specific skills may not be available when required.
It may be possible to recruit existing subcontract staff permanently.
2.5.1
Budget
Are the necessary funds available to make this project a success?
Yes
M Armstrong
Are there contingency funds available to address risks?
Is the budget based on confirmed data?
2.6
Communication
Is there a clear communications plan in place?
Yes
M Armstrong
The client’s requirement may be misunderstood.
Project reporting needs may change during project.
Key stakeholder interests may change (positively or negatively).
2.6.1
Communication Managers
Do all managers communicate in a timely and effective manner both up and down the organizational structure?
Yes
M Armstrong
Have the appropriate communication channels and mediums been established?
Is there a communications matrix available?
2.7
Information
Is all project information available and vetted for the project to start?
Yes
M Armstrong/ Pauling / Christopher
Client may fail to provide required information on time.
Client-supplied information may be inadequate to support project.
2.8
Health Safety & Environmental
Have all environmental factors been taken into account?
Yes
M Armstrong / Felder
Health & safety legislation may change during the project.
An accident or incident may occur delaying the project.
2.9
Quality
Is there an acceptable rate of errors? Does the project need to be error-free at launch?
Yes
Mexicana, Whaley, Reynolds
The number of defects found during integration may not match expectations (higher or lower).
Quality circles may result in significant effort reduction.
Effective quality management may reduce rework.
2.10
Reputation
What impact will the success or failure of this project have on the organization’s reputation?
no
N/A
Corporate reputation incident may damage support for the project.
Senior management may lose confidence in project team.
Improved reputation may increase availability of funds and resources.
Commercial Risks
3.1
Contractual Terms & Conditions
What type of contract is it? Fixed-price? Cost-reimbursable? Time and material?
Client standard terms may prove unacceptably onerous.
Contractual terms may contain internal inconsistencies.
Harmonized client/subcontractor terms may reduce risk exposure.
3.2
Internal Procurement
Can internal departments supply skillsets needed for the project?
Other departments may not deliver as expected.
Required skills may not be available from other departments.
Internal support may increase as the project progresses.
3.3
Suppliers & Vendors
Is the supplier or vendor stable? Is there an established relationship?
A key supplier may go out of business.
Mergers between suppliers may erode competitiveness.
Vendors may be able to deliver ahead of schedule.
3.4
Subcontracts
Does the organization have control over vendor subcontracting?
Key subcontractors may refuse to work together.
Subcontract staff may take industrial action (strike).
Collaborating with selected subcontractors may improve working relationships.
3.5
Client/Customer
Stability
Is there commitment by the client for the completion of the project?
Client may change business focus and withdraw support for project.
Changes in client personnel may require additional project management effort.
Client may be bought out or merge with a more supportive company.
3.6
Partnerships & Joint Ventures
Is this a partnership or joint venture with another organization?
Our partner may have competing commercial interests.
The joint venture may break up.
External Risks
4.1
Legislation
Is there pending government legislation that will impact the project?
Changes in legislation may impose changes in the solution (positive or negative).
Legal requirements may add unforeseen design requirements.
4.2
Exchange Rates
Will monetary exchange rates impact the project?
Exchange rates may change during the project (favorably or unfavorably).
Key suppliers may invoice in foreign currency.
4.3
Site/Facilities
Is the site or facilities available for the project?
Site access may prove more difficult than expected.
Required facilities may not be available on site.
New transport arrangements may ease project logistics.
4.4
Environmental /
Weather
Will the weather affect the project? Are there seasons to consider?
Weather may be unseasonable (better or worse than expected).
Unexpected environmental conditions may affect progress (positively or negatively)
Is there a rainy season?
4.5
Competition
Are there competing organizations in the marketplace?
A key competitor may launch a competing product and invalidate the project.
Key staff may be poached by competitors.
Key competitor may withdraw from the market.
4.6
Regulatory
Are there regulations pending that could impact the project?
Regulatory requirements may impose unexpected design constraints.
Significant changes in regulation may occur during the project (positive or negative).
4.7
Political
Are there political movements, parties, or candidates that may affect the project?
Political factors may influence senior management support for the project.
A change in government may result in changed priorities or legislation (positively or negatively).
4.8
Country
Will the host country impact the project?
Local resources may lack the required skills.
Currency instability may undermine the business case for the project.
Local government interest in the project may change (positively or negatively).
4.9
Social /
Demographic
Is there a social movement or public perception that may affect the project?
Changing social imperatives may impose additional requirements.
Public perception of the project may change (positively or negatively).
4.10
Pressure Groups
Do pressure groups exist who may have impact on the project?
Extremists may disrupt project progress.
Lobby groups may promote the cause of the project.
4.11
Force Majeure
Is there insurance or contract language that addresses “force majeure?”
Force majeure event may occur, disrupting the project.
Occurrence of force majeure may create an opportunity to address underlying issues.
SWOT Analysis (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, & Threats)
[General statement about the critical success factors (CSFs) that will make the project a success]
Strengths: [What things is the organization very good at? Examples: well-trained staff, previous project management experience, leadership in the field.]
Weaknesses [What things is the organization need improvement on? Examples: running over budget, talent skill sets not up to par, little or no project management experience.]
Opportunities [What market forces is the organization taking advantage of? Examples: First to market, new technology, one of a kind.]
Threats [What outside market forces are threats to the organization? Examples: A competitor developing the same product or service, new technology that is a “game changer,” does not comply with government mandates.]
Known Project Risks, Constraints, & Assumptions
Risks [What types of risks are known at the beginning of this project? Brief – Bulleted List]
Constraints [What resources (human, materials, capital) are limited for this project? Brief – Bulleted List]
Assumptions [What can we assume to be a standard part of this project? Brief Bulleted List]
Roles and Responsibilities: [Description on the how the roles and responsibilities have been divided amongst the project team members.]
Name
Role
Position
Contact Information
[TIPS: Moving Toward Distinguished Performance on the Project Charter
Please add this additional information in the appropriate places in the body of the section above. Here are some additional things that may be added to the template to customize it or elaborate on information that is known about the project:
Key Milestones (Examples: Key deliverables such as the design of a Web site or the coding behind the Web site.)
Describes a changing marketplace that justifies the project. (If we don’t do it, our competition will!)
Expansion on the roles and responsibilities of team members. (Name, role, responsibilities, delegation of authority, and so forth.)
Assigning authority to the project manager so she/he may expend organizational assets (human resources, money, equipment, software, and so forth)]
Team Contract
[Description of Team Contract]
[GUIDANCE – TEAM CONTRACT:
Team contracts define how the team members interact with each other. In other words, these are the rules of engagement for the team. For larger size teams this document may become quite extensive in order to make sure everyone understands meeting etiquette so that the team meetings flow smoothly. Beyond the rules of a meeting it may show delegation of authority to subject matter experts (SME) or group leaders who are responsible for a part of the project. Bear in mind that the project manager is ultimately responsible for the success or failure of a project.
This outlines the project manager’s expectations of the team members and may also include the project sponsor, the client or customer, and other stakeholders who may be impacted or have a concern with the project’s deliverables.]
Project Name: Department Relocation Phase 1
Project Manager: Yvette Armstrong
Team Members.
Alyissa Kearney
William Felder
Anthony Whaley
Debra Reynolds
Noah Mexicana
Michael Armstrong
Sheryl Pauling
Richard Christopher
Jessica Veldez
Donyel Anthony
A. Commitments.
As a project team we will:
To relocate 99 users to vacated location on 10 floor 383 Madison
Break down 103 cubicles
Purchase material to build 150 trading desk
Purchase technology equipment (Pc’s, Monitors, keyboards. Mice)
Relocate 150 users into newly built trading desk on 3rd floor west wing.
Expanded Network infostructure to accommodate
B. Team Meeting.
The participation ground rules include:
Attend all meeting on time with all deliverables
The communication ground rules include:
Speaking loud and clear so that all can hear, Holding all comments and questions until the end of each department briefing.
The problem-solving ground rules include:
All problems will be listed and addressed in an orderly fashion and tracked through completion.
The decision-making ground rules include:
Senior management review and approval.
The conflict-handling ground rules include:
expanded
C. Meeting Guidelines.
1. Meetings will be held every Tuesday with Project team and every Friday with Stake holders.
2. Meetings will be called by name of person.
3. Agendas will be issued every Friday by 12 noon giving each department time to get deliverable in order.
4. Meetings will be facilitated by Alyissa Kearney.
5. Evaluations of meetings will be conducted the morning after each meeting.
6. Alyissa Kearney will issue minutes within one day after the meeting. Any questions or concerns will need to be replied by 4pm on the day received.
D. Meeting Procedures.
Check email for meeting invites and arrive 20mins before the meeting start time prepared and ready to go.
Team Member Signatures:
Yvette Armstrong
_______________________________________________________
Project Manager
William Felder
_______________________________________________________
[Facility Management]
Anthony Whaley
_______________________________________________________
Desktop Support
Debra Reynolds
______________________________________________________
[Voice Technician]
Noah Mexicana
_______________________________________________________
Network Technician
Jessica Valdez
_______________________________________________________
Lan / Wan Technician
Donyel Anthony
_______________________________________________________
Procurement Officer
Alyissa Keraney
_______________________________________________________
PM Assistant
Michael Armstrong / Sheryl Pauling / Richard Christopher
_______________________________________________________
Stake Holders
[TIPS: Moving Toward Distinguished Performance on the Team Contract
Please add this additional information in the appropriate places in the body of the section above. Here are some additional things that may be added to the template to customize it or elaborate on information that is known about the project:
Team members names AND job title AND department/area
Code of Conduct (new section)
Collaboration tools (new section)
Collaboration skills (new section)
War Room (new section)
Separate team room for project
Features
Availability
Add an overview of the team goals
Will there be any offsite meetings? If so, what are the rules?
Is there a need for training?
On a new tool?
On new equipment?
Certification?
Are there sub groups or smaller teams feeding into the main project?
Are there contractors? How do they fit into the team contract?
What are the team rules when dealing with outside contacts?
Clients?
Vendors?
Other Organizations?
Adding additional information about each section in the document. (Example: Commitments and what that means within the context of the project.)]
Project Scope
[Description of Project Scope]
[GUIDANCE – PROJECT SCOPE
Scope statements succinctly define what exactly is going to be achieved in the project. They also define what is NOT going to be done as well. For example, a computer lab at a university may upgrade the operating system of the computers but will not be upgrading the machines. ]
Project Overview
[Project Overview Description]
GUIDANCE: Describe the background and context for the project and why it is being undertaken. Discuss the business value of the work being performed.
GUIDANCE – In scope, out of scope: This section is where you clearly define the logical boundaries of your project. These statements are used to define what is within the boundaries of the project and what is outside those boundaries. Data, processes, applications, or business areas are items that could be examined. The following might be helpful to include:
The types of deliverables that are in scope and out of scope (business requirements, current state assessment).
The major life cycle processes that are in and out of scope (analysis, design, testing).
The types of data that are in and out of scope (financial, sales, employee).
The data sources (or databases) that are in scope and out of scope (billing, general ledger, and payroll).
The organizations that are in scope and out of scope (human resources, manufacturing, vendors).
The major functionality that is in scope and out of scope (decision support, data entry, management reporting).
In scope:
Deliverable that will be performed in this project.
Deliverable that will be performed in this project.
Deliverable that will be performed in this project.
Deliverable that will be performed in this project.
Examples:
Out of scope:
Deliverable that will NOT be performed in this project.
Deliverable that will NOT be performed in this project.
Deliverable that will NOT be performed in this project.
Deliverable that will NOT be performed in this project.
Examples:
Work Breakdown Structure (WBS)
[Description of Work Breakdown Structure (WBS)
[GUIDANCE – WORK BREAKDOWN STRUCTURE
A work breakdown structure (WBS) is included in the Scope Statement documentation. Usually there are two views.
The first view is a hierarchical one that is usually worked upon by the project manager and team to discover exactly what tasks need to be done and in what order. (You will have to show more detail or levels than these examples.)
WBS hierarchy example (Created in Microsoft VISIO, saved as a jpeg picture, inserted into this Word document)] If you have difficulty displaying the WBS on these pages or as an embedded VISIO object, you may submit it separately with your project plan.
The second view is a list view or outline of the WBS.
Project: Building a garage
Initiate
Need a garage?
Et cetera.
Plan
What type of garage?
Et cetera.
Execute
Pour the foundation
Et cetera.
Monitor and Control
Observe the cement workers
Et cetera.
Close
Inspect garage
Et cetera.
Note that the hierarchy view and the list view have the same tasks and are numbered the same.
The graphic view may be achieved by using MS VISIO, MS Word (Draw Feature), or MS PowerPoint Organization Template.
[TIPS: Moving Toward Distinguished Performance on the Project Scope
Please add this additional information in the appropriate places in the body of the section above. Here are some additional things that may be added to the template to customize it or elaborate on information that is known about the project:
A thorough explanation of
What is in Scope
What is NOT in Scope
Adding color to the WBS to further clarify a phase or layer
Making sure the numbers match the tasks between the hierarchy WBS and the list WBS.
Project deliverables also include project documentation (team contract, project charter, scope document, and so forth)
Risk Breakdown Structure (RBS)
[Description of Risk Breakdown Structure]
[GUIDANCE – RISK BREAKDOWN STRUCTURE
A risk breakdown structure (RBS) is included in the Scope Statement documentation. This figure is one that is usually worked upon by the project manager and team to discover exactly what tasks need to be done and in what order. (You will have to show more detail or levels than these examples.)
RBS hierarchy top level (Created in Microsoft VISIO, saved as a jpeg picture, inserted into this Word document)] 3rd and deeper levels will be transferred from the Risk Identification Questions on pages 5 thru 12 eliminating those risks that do not apply. If you have difficulty displaying the RBS on these pages or as an embedded VISIO object, you may submit it separately with your project plan.
Budget
[1.6M]
[GUIDANCE – PROJECT BUDGET
Budgets need to be complete and detailed enough so there is no question on how the money is being spent. Organizations are different on what they include on their project budgets because many of the human resources are already on the payroll being paid for operational work.
However, some organizations want a full accounting of the project and will include the costs of the personnel even though they are already on the payroll. It is expected that you will include personnel in this assignment budget or offer an explanation on why these monies are not tracked. ]
Communications Matrix
[Description of Communications Matrix]
[GUIDANCE – COMMUNICATIONS MATRIX
Communications matrices assist the project manager in making sure all information is being distributed to the correct personnel whether it is the project team, sponsor, upper management, customer or stakeholders.]
Information
Provider
Recipient(s)
Frequency
Medium
Location
Status Report
PM
Sponsor
Bi-weekly
Email
SharePoint
Stakeholder Communications Analysis
[Description of Stakeholder Communications Analysis]
[GUIDANCE – STAKEHOLDER COMMUNICATION ANALYSIS
Stakeholder communications analysis assists the project manager in specifically spelling out delivery of specific reports for the project. The communications matrix above helps guide this more specific section in determining who is receiving project information.]
Stakeholders
Document Name
Document Format
Contact Person
Due
Top Management
Status Report
Hard Copy
Sheila Thompson
1st Monday of Month
Glossary [Description of Glossary]
[GUIDANCE – GLOSSARY
Glossaries are used to explain terms specific to the project and to the discipline. For example if you are installing a network you may need to define terms like “switch,” “fiber optics,” and “domain name.” Also you should define terms that are indigenous to project management such as “WBS” or work breakdown structure, gold plating and the like. ]
[TIPS: Moving toward Distinguished Performance on the Glossary
Please add this additional information in the appropriate places in the body of the section above. Here are some additional things that may be added to the template to customize it or elaborate on information that is known about the project:
An example explaining the term
Make sure the term is in layman’s terms
May pull terms from dictionary or PMBOK® or textbook but make sure to cite them.
RACI Matrix
[Overview of RACI Matrix]
[GUIDANCE – RACI Matrix
RACI matrices clarify who are responsible, accountable, consulted, and informed. In some cases, a person who is a subject matter expert (SME) may be consulted with and then will need to be informed to inspect the completed task. In other words, there may be one or more letters associated with a person.
This template has the basic project lifecycle phases in it. Tasks will have to be transferred from the Work and Risk Breakdown Structures as well as additional personnel for the specific project.
Risk Matrix
[Type in overview of Risk Matrix here]
[GUIDANCE – RISK MATRIX
Risk Matrices are at the core of solving problems before they have an impact on the project scope, cost, schedule, and product quality. Clearly one may categorize risks on what they are going to impact or the type of risk. For example there may be risks because of the personnel on the team (they may need training on a new technology or if one team member is sick, his or her contribution and expertise will be lost) or there have been problems in the past with a certain vendor and so forth.
However another way of looking at it is whether the risks may fit into three different scenarios:
Known, knowns (It is known when the risk may occur and what it is.)
Unknown, knowns (It is unknown when the risk may occur but it is a known entity.)
Unknown, Unknowns (Neither the timing nor the risk is known, a surprise.)
There are many ways to categorize and order risks so that the project manager and the team will be on top of the situation and will be able to mitigate or control the risks when they occur. The important part of the risk matrix is to make sure that most of the risks are identified and that there are defined actions to deal with them.]
ID
Rank
Risk
Probability (Low, Medium, High)
Severity (L,M,H)
Mitigation Approach
STATUS
Category
Watch List?
1.
10.
Team skill sets not up to par
MEDIUM
HIGH
Train team members on new technology
Personnel
NO
LOW
Choose an item.
Choose an item.
Choose an item.
Choose an item.
KEY
HIGH (RED) – 67% to 100% Chance of Occurring or Impact MEDIUM (ORANGE) – 33% to 66% Chance of Occurring or ImpactLOW (YELLOW) – 1% to 32% Chance of Occurring or Impact
Status
Green = O.K. Yellow = Look AtRed = In Trouble
Possible Categories – Budget, Cost, Equipment, Logistics, Quality, Personnel, Scope, Technical, Time, (PMBOK ® Knowledge Areas, or Make Up Your Own)
Risk Stakeholder Roles and Responsibilities
[Description of Risk Stakeholders and Responsibilities]
[GUIDANCE – RISK STAKEHOLDER ROLES AND RESPONSIBLITIES
Risk Stakeholder Roles and Responsibilities assist the project leaders in knowing who has been assigned to general and specific risks. This is helpful because there are now more eyes overseeing risks that could affect project progress. As with all matrices this one can be expanded as “progressive elaboration” appears during a project. In order to create more table rows, simple place your cursor in the last cell in the lower right corner of the table and press the Tab Key. ]
Role
Risk Management Responsibility
Specific Risks
Assignment
Notes
Project Manager
The project manager is responsible for the project risk management plan being implemented and for reporting to the project sponsor and management group.
Team member unavailable
Updating risks statuses
Loran Walker
The project manager typically oversees all risks in a project.
Risk Management Process and Activities
[Risk Management Process and Activities Description]
[GUIDANCE – RISK MANAGEMENT PROCESS AND ACTIVITIES
Risk management process and activities assist the project leaders in knowing how to approach project risks processes. For example there may be a need to update the risk watch list or it may be helpful to have a procedure in place if a negative risk does occur so that everyone knows the process and who should be involved. As with all matrices this one can be expanded as “progressive elaboration” appears during a project. In order to create more table rows, simple place your cursor in the last cell in the lower right corner of the table and press the Tab Key. ]
Risk Management Activity
Risk Management Task Description
Ownership (Participants)
Notes
[Risk identification]
[Identify the techniques that are used to identify risk factors at the beginning of the project and on an ongoing basis. This may involve a formal risk assessment workshop, a brainstorming session, and interviews at the beginning of each major milestone phase.]
[Identify project team members and key stakeholders to be involved.]
[Additional detail on the process.]
Review risk watch list
Update the risk priorities
Project sponsor, project manager, project team, subject matter experts (SMEs)
Contact appropriate SMEs for input. Can be done by phone or e-mail.
Project Schedule
[Description of Project Schedule]
[GUIDANCE – PROJECT SCHEDULE
Schedules are used throughout the project. Usually a project manager is told how much time is available to complete a project. Many times a project manager has to make the project “fit” into the time allotted. However, when a detailed schedule is created the project manager may have to go back to the sponsor to discuss a more realistic schedule to achieve the product of the project.
A detailed schedule is not put in place until the scope statement and work breakdown structure (WBS) is discussed and created by the project team. The schedule emanates from the scope statement and work breakdown structure.
Part of the reason for introducing students to Microsoft Project software is to enable them to use this tool to effectively create a project schedule for their assignment. Do not be afraid to use features introduced in the MS Project Labs such as hyperlinks to relevant websites or using notes or comments to clarify the milestones or tasks.
Embedded below is a blank Microsoft Project document:]
[TIPS: Moving toward Distinguished Performance on the Project Schedule
Please add this additional information in the appropriate places in the body of the section above. Here are some additional things that may be added to the template to customize it or elaborate on information that is known about the project:
Separate Word document explaining and clarifying the schedule.
If the Task is greater than 8-10 working days, it may need to be broken down into smaller tasks
Schedule shows predecessors to tasks.
Use of the Note feature in MS Project.
Use of the Comment feature in MS Project.
Use of the Hyperlink feature in MS Project.
Add resources to the tasks.
Customize the look of the Gantt chart.
Create a callout on a specific task that will need attention.]
References
Risk Identification Questions – Pages 5 thru 12 draws from the 3 following books and Template:
Hillson, D., & Simon, P. (2012). Practical project risk management: The ATOM methodology (2nd edition). Vienna, VA: Management Concepts
Hillson, D. (2009). Managing risks in projects. Burlington, Vermont. Page 33.
Pcubed. (2004). Risk identification questionnaire [Microsoft Word template]. Retrieved from http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/templates/risk-identification-questionnaire-TC001142331.aspx
Appendices
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