Appendicitis Introduction One day, an 11-year-old boy came to the emergency room

Appendicitis
Introduction
One day, an 11-year-old boy came to the emergency room complaining of acute non-traumatic upper abdominal pain (Algahtani et al., 2019). He was a healthy boy with no medical history and unknown family history. Though his family history was unknown, having a family member who has had appendicitis would be a risk factor that would have increased the patient’s likelihood of developing appendicitis (Children’s Hospital of St. Louis, n.d.). The patient stated that he had only felt the pain for one day and showed signs and symptoms vomiting, fever, and constipation that was attributed to his pain. The hospital treated him for his signs and symptoms and discharged him to his home. After three days, the patient returned to the hospital complaining of moderate non-radiating and continuous abdominal pain in both the right upper quadrant and in his right flank. He also presented with dysuria and a fever. Following many exams, the patient was diagnosed with acute subhepatic appendicitis. As a nurse, the focus in a case of appendicitis is treatment of pain, administration of antibiotics and IV fluids, and frequent monitoring.
History
The patient was an otherwise healthy young boy. Inflammation of the appendix is very common in children, and often becomes a surgical emergency (Algahtani et al., 2019). The patient’s appendix was in an atypical position as it was under the liver and most appendixes are located behind the cecum. This position contributed to the patient presenting with a delayed onset of the typical symptoms of appendicitis. The patient first came into the emergency room with complaints of pain, vomiting, fever, and constipation. When palliative treatment to treat these signs and symptoms was unsuccessful, the patient returned to the emergency room with worsened symptoms of moderate and continuous pain in the right upper quadrant and in his right flank. The patient had no medical history and was not taking any medications upon visiting the hospital. Because treatment was prolonged, the patient was at risk of his appendix rupturing and leading to a more severe infection called peritonitis, or the infection of the abdominal cavity lining (Banasik, 2018).