Boyd 4 Boyd 0 Boyd 1 Krista Boyd WR 121 Professor Friedman

Boyd 4
Boyd 0
Boyd 1
Krista Boyd
WR 121
Professor Friedman
7/31/2022
Analysis Essay
The world would be much better if people who participated in inappropriate behavior were regularly subjected to painful and humiliating punishments. If this event were to happen, the world would be significantly more pleasant. Flogging was formerly a widespread punishment for criminals and other offenders; even so, I am not recommending that we bring back the practice of flogging now. On the other hand, I recommend that we reinstate the act of flogging, but only in the figurative sense. To put it another way, should we bring back the practice of making flogging socially acceptable because it humiliates and causes suffering to offenders?
Flogging is not a novel concept, but many of the most progressive leaders in the world have come out in support of it. In his book “Long Walk to Freedom,” Nelson Mandela, for instance, advocated for reintroducing flogging as a method of corporal punishment. Furthermore, even though these leaders may be supporters of social progress, they are not the only ones who hold this view. According to a recent poll, many people in the United States (eighty-two percent) favor using physical punishment.
There are numerous justifications for why the use of flogging as a form of punishment is effective. To begin, we start by saying that this type of punishment is well publicized, so it conveys a clear message not only to the person who committed the crime but also to the community. Second, because it is so excruciatingly painful, it serves as an effective deterrent against people engaging in actions that are not acceptable (Jacoby 32). Thirdly, it is a highly humiliating punishment, which causes offenders to reevaluate their behavior and consider alternative options. Finally, flogging is an effective type of rehabilitation known to rehabilitate offenders more effectively than other forms of punishment. This event is the fourth and most important benefit of flogging as rehabilitation.
Why then don’t we use flogging as a form of punishment anymore? One reason is that it has been superseded by other forms of punishment considered humanitarian, such as incarceration or probation. On the other hand, flogging is a bit too barbaric for today’s culture and is no longer practiced. It would be to our benefit if we were to do so to rethink this viewpoint and reinstate the use of flogging as a metaphor for other forms of punishment. It would be a move in the right direction if you did that. and make our society a much better place to live—a move in the right way.
Conclusively, Nelson Mandela supported the use of flogging as a form of corporal punishment and argued for its reinstatement in his book “Long Walk to Freedom.” The world would be much better if people who participated in inappropriate behavior were routinely exposed to painful and humiliating punishments. This would make the world a far more pleasant place to live. This idea is not a groundbreaking idea, as evidenced by the fact that numerous progressive leaders have expressed their support for it. However, even though public flogging was once a standard method of punishment for criminals and other offenders, I will not be advocating that we bring back the practice of public flogging at this time. There are many varied reasons why the use of flogging as a form of punishment is successful. Flogging is a proven method of rehabilitation that is acknowledged to be more effective in rehabilitating offenders than other forms of punishment. It is corporal punishment. It would be a move in the right direction if you did that. And make our society a much better place to live if we were to achieve it.
Works Cited
Jacoby, Jeff. Bring Back Flogging. 2022, https://www.jeffjacoby.com/6758/bring-back-flogging, pp.12-36