Care Coordination Scenario II Introduction Challenge Details Case Interview with Rebecca and

Care Coordination Scenario II
Introduction
Challenge Details
Case
Interview with Rebecca and Avi Snyder
Treatment Recommendation
Case Update
Interview with Rebecca Snyder & Devorah Kaufman
Hospice Recommendation
Hospice Introductions
Hospice Facility Recommendation
Conclusion
Introduction
One of the most important roles in care coordination is the effective management of patient transition points. Finding the most appropriate facility for a patient—whether a rehabilitation facility, a nursing home, hospice, a home health care situation, or something else—is often a complicated manner. The care coordination team will have to consider the patient’s medical, financial, and social situation. The team will also have to be aware of any relevant regulations, and they need to keep in mind that regulations are subject to change. A facility that seems like an ideal match for a patient may not be feasible for any number of reasons.
In this activity, you will practice making recommendations in the role of a care coordinator who has to find appropriate care for a terminally ill patient. You will see the consequences of less-than-optimal decisions and will have the opportunity to correct these decisions. In the courseroom, you will have the opportunity to apply current regulations to the decisions that need to be made about this particular case.
After completing the activity, you will be prepared to:
Problem-solve a care coordination scenario related to transitioning a patient to a new facility.
Apply relevant regulations to a patient case related to transitions.
Challenge Details
Seven months have passed since Rebecca Snyder was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. Recent tests show that the cancer has spread. There is a strong possibility that chemotherapy might prolong her life, but Mrs. Snyder is in a good deal of pain and wants to go to hospice care. You are still working as an intern in the Case Management Department at St. Anthony Medical Center, and you have been assigned back to Mrs. Snyder’s case. You will have some decisions to make about what recommendations to make about her end-of-life care. The decisions you make can have a serious impact on Mrs. Snyder’s quality of life in her final days.
Rebecca Snyder Case
It looks like you have email from Denise McGladrey, your preceptor. Read the message, then review the documents below.
Email
From: Denise McGladrey, Preceptor
Subject: Rebecca Snyder case
I’m sure you remember the Rebecca Snyder case that you worked on seven months ago. That was the first complex case that we assigned to you, and you did an excellent job sending Mrs. Snyder home with the resources and support she needed.
Mrs. Snyder is back in the hospital, and we are assigning this case back to you. Unfortunately, Mrs. Snyder’s ovarian cancer has spread. Her oncologist has recommended another course of chemotherapy, along with medications. The oncologist hopes this course of action could improve the quality of Mrs. Snyder’s life and also extend her life for another year.
However, Mrs. Snyder is in a good deal of pain and wants to discontinue treatment beyond palliative care. Her family is fighting her on this. As you may recall, Mrs. Snyder is very anxious about doctors and pain, and they think she is giving up treatment prematurely because she is afraid of it. They think she is not psychologically sound to make this decision.
As you know, this has been a challenging case, but I know you can handle it. As always, the CC team and I are available if you need to bounce some ideas off of someone.
Thanks,Denise
Mrs. Snyder’s Electronic Medical Record
PATIENT INFORMATION
Patient Name: Rebecca SnyderDOB: 04/24/1953Address: 1375 Cadburry Lane, St. Louis Park MN 55402
Patient ID: #6700891Gender: FemalePhone: (612) 776-8900
Insurance: MedicarePrimary Care Provider: Dr. Vereen, Vila East
Contact Permissions:David Snyder, husband (952) 493-9302Avi Snyder, son (952) 783-0021
PATIENT HISTORY
H&P: This patient is well known to me. Mrs. Snyder is a pleasant 57 year old obese Orthodox Jewish women newly diagnosed with Stage 4 ovarian cancer. PMH of poorly controlled DM, HTN, hypercholesterolemia, anxiety, and obesity. Recent falls. Decline in functional status.
Family Hx.Mother: Alive. History of HTN, DM, Dementia, Stroke, PEG.Father: Deceased. HX of MI, Colorectal CASister: Alive. Recurrent breast CA. S/p Right mastectomy. New onset back pain with spine metastasis.
Meds on Adm: Lisinopril 40 mg po QDXanax 0.5 mg q 8 hr. PRNLantis 30 units of Q am SQNovalog 10 mg 3 times a day. SQCarboplatin IV q 30 days.
Neuro: A&O x3. C/O 10/10headache unresponsive to NSAIDS. Visual disturbance worsened. Worsening anxiety, difficulty sleeping, often irritable.
Respiratory: SOB with min exertion. In ED, sats 88% on room air. CXR reveals worsening pulmonary edema.
GU: c/o frequent urination with occasionally “not making it to the commode in the living room.” Occasional vaginal bleeding.
GI: Nausea and vomiting with chemo. Poor appetite. Increase in “bloated feeling” in abd. Admits to abd pain. Constipated. Recent report of dark colored stools.
POC: CBC, BMP, 10u insulin stat, check blood glucose q 1 hr., transfuse as necessary, Obtain brain MRI r/o brain metastasis, GYN/ONC consult.
ALLERGIES & MEDICATION
Allergies: Sulfa
Medication: #6700891Metformin 1500 mg po bidLisinopril 40 mg po qdXanax 0.25-0.5 mg prn anxietyPravastatin 60 mg po bidChemotherapy: Cisplatin q 30 days per GYN/ONCMotrin 800 mg po q8 hr.
LAB
CBC:RBC: 2.8HCT:22.8HGB: 9.1WBC: 2.1MCV:72MCH: 27PLT: 56
BMP:Glucose: 401BUN: 33Cr: 3.2Sodium: 129Potassium: 4.4Chloride: 101CO2: 22Calcium: 19Protein: 4.9
PRIMARY CARE NOTES
10/10/19:Glucose remains elevated but is responding will to new insulin regime. Concerned about low Hct/Hgb-suspect Upper GIB. Occult blood in stools positive. Transfuse two unit PRBC’s.
GYN/ONC consult.
10/12/19:Mrs. Snyder is a 57 year old Orthodox women newly dx. Metastatic ovarian cancer, Uncontrolled DM (401), GIB, metastatic brain mass.
PMH of poorly controlled DM, HTN, hypercholesterolemia, anxiety, and obesity.
Dx: Metastatic ovarian cancer with brain mets, uncontrolled DM, HTN, obesity, anxiety, hypercholesterolemia, obesity.
Discussed diagnosis with Mrs. Snyder. Education provided about her secondary metastatic brain tumor. Family present in room. Answered questions.
POC: GYN/ONC consult, CM, SW, PT consult.
SOCIAL WORK
10/24/19:Met with Mrs. Snyder after receiving call from PCP. Pt with new dx. Of metastatic ovarian cancer. Family very concerned about prognosis and are encouraging patient to continue with current treatment. Mrs. Snyder explained that she feels “awful” almost all of the time, and that “I just can’t do this anymore!”
Family at bedside. SW provided support and listened to family concerns.
POC: Discuss pt. care plan with PCP and CM. Team meeting
Goal: Safe transition of care.
10/24/19:PCP: nameCM: nameDietician: namePhysical Therapist: nameGYN/ONC: name
Team meeting discussion:Here, we can write a discussion between team members. This will be more or less a conversation. We may want to have another team meeting and invite the patient and family. Please share your thoughts.
CASE MANAGEMENT
Met with Mrs. Snyder and her son Avi. Pt. and family with recent diagnosis of metastatic ovarian Cancer to brain. Pt presents with a 10/10 headache and has experienced recent falls at home without obvious injury. Purpose of the meeting was to discuss “next steps” as patients’ disease is progressing. Pt. stated that she does not want to continue chemo tx. Stating that it causing her undue pain and anxiety. Family expressed that they want mom around to watch her grandchildren grow. Encouraging patient to continue tx. As a cure could come anytime.
DIABETES EDUCATOR
Mrs. Snyder is a 57 year old obese Orthodox women with a PMH of poorly controlled DM, HTN, hypercholesterolemia, anxiety, and obesity. Admitted to the ED with c/o recent falls, uncontrolled DM, and dark colored stools.
Met with Mrs Snyder to discuss nutritional needs. Pt. explained that she has a full feeling with bloating and is not hungry. She described that when she does eat or drink that she feels nauseous and experiences vomiting. Pt. has been on an over-the-counter antiemetic, but stopped taking it because it makes her eyes itch and makes her too drowsy to stay awake. Pt. stated she has not been following her diabetic plan of care-stating that it just “too much!” Stating that she will eat what she wants, whenever she wants to. Quite despondent. Appears sad and withdrawn.
Educated patient on self-care.
POC: Mrs. Snyder may benefit from a prescribed antiemetic. Will discuss with PCP. Obtain current weight as patient has stated she has lost at least 3 sizes over the last 7 months.
REHAB
10/13/19Mrs. Snyder is newly dx. Metastatic ovarian cancer, to brain, Uncontrolled DM with blood glucose of 401, GIB, metastatic brain mass.
PMH of poorly controlled DM, HTN, hypercholesterolemia, anxiety, and obesity. Recent HX of multiple recent falls.
Mrs. Snyder lives a multi-level house with 8 STE. One flight of steps to second level. Bed and bath on 2nd level with first floor set up available. Resides with husband, debilitated elderly mother and 2 teenage sons. Household duties include meal preparation, driving and managing personal and business finances. Pt. requires assistance of 1 person to shop for groceries and to clean. Able to walk house hold distances by holding onto furniture. Requires minimal assistance with ADL’s. Requires additional time due to fatigue and recent SOB.
Pt. ambulated 5′ with min A due to unsteadiness. SOB. O2sats 88%. Placed on O2 2L. Sats improved to 93% after two minutes. Bed to chair transfer: Min A or one person and AD. Toilet transfer: Min A with one person and AD. Walked with a RW 8′ with one seated rest break.
LTG: Patient will ambulate safely 10′ with ADSTG: Pt will learn how to use a rolling walker when ambulating and with all transfers.
PROGRESS NOTES
SEE ABOVE
GYN/ONC
Mrs. Snyder is well known to me as an oncology patient. Mrs. Snyder is a 57 year old Orthodox women with a PMH of poorly controlled DM, HTN, anxiety, and obesity. She admits to the ED with c/o hyperglycemia, GIB, recent falls. Now dx. With a metastatic brain lesion. Radiologic studies confirm dx. Of metastatic brain lesion. At this time, chemotherapy appears to be stalling her ovarian cancer. Continued chemotherapy in conjunction with IV steroids and antiemetic’s may be an option for continues symptom control and pain management. Will discuss with family.
Interview with Rebecca and Avi Snyder
Mrs. Snyder is in her hospital room with her son, Avi. You have spoken to Avi before about Mrs. Snyder’s treatment, and he has been very helpful. You should meet with them to find out more about Mrs. Snyder’s current needs. Ask them as many questions as you like to get the answers you need.
Rebecca Snyder
Patient, St. Anthony Medical Center
Avi Snyder
Rebecca Snyder’s Son
Mrs. Snyder, how are you feeling?
Rebecca: Right this moment I’m doing okay because look at all this morphine they have me on!
Avi: Too much morphine in my opinion. It’s not good for her.
Rebecca: Oy, Avi, what does it matter if it’s not good for me? You should want your dying mother to be comfortable.
Avi: She isn’t dying yet. The doctor says she could live for a year or more if she gets more chemo. But she won’t listen.
Rebecca: It’s my time, Avi! I’m ready to go. And I’m sick of you and everyone else trying to keep me here when I’m in pain.
Why don’t you want to continue with chemotherapy?
Rebecca: I had a round of chemo and it was horrible! I threw up all the time and I was in so much pain. I refuse to go through that again.
Avi: But Mom, it will give you another whole year! At least!
Rebecca: Another year of what?
Avi: Look, my mother here is depressed and anxious. She’s terrified of pain. I don’t think she’s in the right state of mind to make a decision that’s going to end her life.
Rebecca: I most certainly am in the right state of mind!
Avi: My mother needs a psych consult.
Rebecca: How dare you speak as if I’m not in the room! I am an adult and I am perfectly capable of making my own decisions.
How are things going at home?
Rebecca: They’re okay. I can’t do everything that I used to do.
Avi: And that’s one of the main reasons she’s depressed. She’s used to doing things for everyone else.
Rebecca: I am not depressed. I’m just a little frustrated. There’s a difference.
Avi: She cleans, she cooks, she walks the dogs… she acts like nothing has changed. It’s no wonder she feels sick all the time when she won’t take a break. At least she finally relented and let us move her mother into a home.
Rebecca: I did. I don’t feel good about that.
Avi: It’s a very nice facility with kosher food and great nurses.
Rebecca: But it’s all the way on the other side of town. I don’t get to visit every day, especially now that I’m sick. I still feel like if I were a better daughter, I would have found a way to take care of my mother in my home.
Are you getting the help at home you need?
Rebecca: A lot of people have stepped in to help. Neighbors, people from the synagogue, cousins, you name it. It’s overwhelming.
Avi: And you need to let these people help you, Mom. She turns people away who want to do things like cook, which is ridiculous.
Rebecca: I can still cook for myself! I don’t want all these people around doing things that I’m perfectly capable of doing. It makes me feel guilty.
Avi: Guilty? Mom, you’ve been doing things for other people your whole life. It’s time for you to let other people take care of you.
Rebecca: I don’t want to be a burden! If I weren’t here anymore, people wouldn’t need to do these things.
Avi: Mom, stop talking like that! Do you hear her?
After you are discharged from the hospital, where would you like to go?
Rebecca: I want to go home. I am not going to die in some facility. I want to be surrounded by my family and die peacefully. And I want to be a burden to as few people as possible.
Avi: Mom, that’s fine eventually. But you’re not ready yet. There are still options for treatment.
Rebecca: There are no options that I can handle. No more pain, Avi, That’s all I ask. Send me with some good pain medications and let me fade away without suffering.
Avi: You are not in a psychologically sound position to make that decision.
Rebecca: Oy, Avi, you’ve gone meshuga! The whole family has gone meshuga.
What can we do to help you, Mrs. Snyder?
Rebecca: I just don’t want to be in pain anymore! And I don’t want to be a burden to my family. If the chemo didn’t hurt so much and make me so sick, then I would give it a try. Of course I would. Why wouldn’t I want to spend another year with my family? But there’s no way I can stand another round of that chemo. It was horrible! Please do what you can to get me sent home so I can die without pain.
What can we do to help you, Mr. Snyder?
Avi: Thank you for asking. I don’t know what to do anymore. I know my mother doesn’t have that much longer with us, but the doctor said there’s a really good chance she could live for a year or even more with another chemo treatment. If we could just find a way to get her through this treatment, then she could have months more to enjoy her last year. She deserves that. Please help me find a way to get through to her!
Treatment Recommendation
You need to make a recommendation about what the Snyders should do next. Choose one of these options.
Recommendation One
Strongly recommend that she go through with the chemo as recommended by the doctor. This could add a year to her life—and a quality year, once she completes the treatment.
Mrs. Snyder is furious. She gives you a piece of her mind and throws you out of her room. Later, when you try to see her again, she refuses.
Clearly this was not the best option. Mrs. Snyder has made up her mind that she doesn’t want to continue with the chemo. You should try another option.
Recommendation Two
Talk to the oncologist and other team members to find out if there are less uncomfortable chemotherapy options, and better ways to manage Mrs. Snyder’s pain and nausea.
Congratulations! You made an excellent decision.
You consult with an oncology nurse. The nurse comes to speak with Mrs. Snyder about medications that can be used to manage her pain and nausea. You also speak with the oncologist. Apparently Mrs. Snyder never told the oncologist how much she was struggling with side effects. The oncologist agrees to adjust the dosages of the chemo.
Mrs. Snyder is relieved. She didn’t know that these options were available, and she decides she wants to give another round of chemo a try.
Recommendation Three
Start investigating hospice arrangements—either home hospice or a facility. You can figure out the specifics later, but clearly Mrs. Snyder is a competent adult who has made this decision.
Denise: I’m going to stop you right there. You are right that Mrs. Snyder is a competent adult who can make her own decisions. Ultimately, if she wants to end her treatment, she can end her treatment. But are you sure there isn’t another course of action you could recommend first?
Recommendation Four
Send Mrs. Snyder to a psychiatrist for a recommendation to see if she is of sound mind to make this decision—and see if there anti-anxiety drugs that could help ease her through the fear of chemo.
Per your recommendation, Mrs. Snyder is sent for a psychiatric consultation. The psychiatrist concludes that she is more than capable of making her own decisions, even though she is depressed and anxious. The psychiatrist questions your decision to send Mrs. Snyder for a consultation.
You should try something else.
Rebecca Snyder Case Update
A day has passed since you met with Mrs. Snyder. It looks like you have email from Denise McGladrey, your preceptor.
Email
From: Denise McGladrey, Preceptor
Subject: Rebecca Snyder case update
Bad news. It turns out that Mrs. Snyder’s cancer has spread more than was initially discovered. Her oncologist no longer recommends another round of chemotherapy, and instead recommends palliative care. Her prognosis is six months or less, so as you know, she is now eligible for hospice care.
Mrs. Snyder now needs help coordinating end-of-life care. You should meet with her as soon as you can. Good luck, and thank you again for all your good work on this case.
Thanks,
Denise
Interview with Rebecca Snyder and Devorah Kaufman
Mrs. Snyder is in her hospital room with her daughter, Devorah. Devorah is seven months pregnant. You should meet with them to find out more about Mrs. Snyder’s current needs. Ask them as many questions as you need.
Rebecca Snyder
Patient, St. Anthony Medical Center
Devorah Kaufman
Rebecca Snyder’s Daughter
How are you feeling today, Mrs. Snyder?
Rebecca: Well, the doctor just gave me six months to live. Otherwise, I’m peachy keen!
Devorah: They’ve adjusted the pain medications. So she’s feeling okay, at least for now.
Rebecca: I’m hungry. I could really go for a banana split.
Devorah: Mom, that’s not a good idea with your diabetes.
Rebecca: Oy, my diabetes. That’s what I want for my last meal, Devorah. A banana split.
Devorah: As you can see, she’s in a better mood. I think she actually feels relieved about the diagnosis.
Rebecca: I do feel relieved. Does that sound crazy? For months I’ve been worried about what’s going to happen next, and now I know.
What can I do to help you right now?
Rebecca: I just want to go home. I want to be in my own house surrounded by my family. That’s not too much to ask, is it?
Devorah: Of course not.
Rebecca: This palliative care… I can do that at home, right? You can send me home with pain medications? I don’t want to suffer.
Devorah: I’ve been reading about home hospice care. It definitely seems like the right option for our family. If we could have a home nurse to help out with some of the harder stuff, we can handle the rest.
If you choose home hospice, are there family members or others who can help?
Devorah: I can take care of my mother. And my brother Avi will help.
Rebecca: Oy, Devorahleh, I don’t want to burden you. There’s too much for you to do all by yourself, and Lord knows your father isn’t going to help. That baby will be here soon, and you have two other little ones at home to take care of.
Devorah: The baby won’t be here for another three months. And this pregnancy is going great—much better than the other two. My blood pressure hasn’t shot up in weeks. My mother-in-law has offered to help with the girls so I can take care of my mother.
Rebecca: But she works!
Devorah: But her schedule is flexible. At least most of the time it is.
Rebecca: And what if you have to go on bedrest? You did at the end of your other two pregnancies.
Devorah: That’s not going to happen, Mom. I feel great and my blood pressure has been close to normal. And Avi can help too.
Rebecca: Oy, Avi. Tell him to leave his liquor bottles at home.
Devorah: Avi’s been sober for months, Mom.
Rebecca: I wouldn’t say ‘months.’ When did he get out of rehab?
Devorah: He’s fine, Mom. And there’s a possibility that my aunt will come in from Florida and help out as well. She was here for a couple of weeks when mom first got diagnosed and that was a huge help.
Rebecca: Janet has health problems of her own now. Her back is really bad and I don’t think she’s supposed to fly.
Devorah: I’m pretty sure she can fly as long as it’s not too often. And there’s people from the synagogue who will be helping out too. We can definitely handle home hospice. We’ve been through worse!
How do you feel about hospice facilities?
Rebecca: They’re for old people who don’t have families. Not for someone like me.
Devorah: Hospice facilities seem like such lonely places. Why would anyone want to die in a facility like that when they could be in their own home?
Rebecca: Exactly. And I know that some hospices are actually pretty nice. But I don’t think I’d ever feel comfortable in a place like that. I want to be able to look at my old photo albums and put the twins to sleep at night. It’s bad enough that I’m not going to be able to be there for them anymore… [tears up] I’m sorry. I want to be able to spend as much time with my children and my grandchildren as I can.
Devorah: You will, Mom.
Rebecca: And my dogs. I know that sounds crazy. I couldn’t stand the thought of having those farstinkehneh beasts in my house until the boys just begged me. And now I can’t wait to get home and cuddle with them! It’s not like I could bring my dogs to a hospice facility.
Devorah: You don’t have to go to a hospice facility, Mom. You took care of your mother for years. It’s my obligation and my honor to do the same for you.
If you had to stay in a hospice facility, do you have a preference for a particular type of facility?
Devorah: I don’t even want to think of that possibility.
Rebecca: Well, we should discuss this, I think. What if you go on bedrest again?
Devorah: Mom…
Rebecca: Just in case, Devorah, we should talk about it. There’s a Jewish hospice facility not far from our house. I visited people from the synagogue there a few times. They have kosher food and they even have religious services on Friday and Saturday.
Devorah: But that place looks so sterile.
Rebecca: It’s not so bad inside. I mean, it’s certainly not my first choice. But if I have to go to a facility, that’s the one I’d want. I definitely couldn’t go to a facility that wasn’t Jewish. I wouldn’t be able to eat the food and I certainly wouldn’t feel comfortable.
Treatment Recommendation
Mrs. Snyder asks you for your recommendation. Should you recommend home hospice care, or recommend a hospice facility?
Recommendation One
Recommend home hospice care. It’s going to be a challenge for the family, but it’s very clear that’s what the patient wants, and she’s of sound mind to make that decisions.
You help the Snyder family with the financial arrangements, and Mrs. Snyder goes home for hospice. Unfortunately, problems arise immediately. Devorah’s mother-in-law is not able to watch her children as often as she needs. In addition, there’s a good possibility that she’ll have to be back on bedrest soon. Avi also doesn’t come by as often as he is needed, probably because he is drinking again. Mrs. Snyder’s sister is unable to fly in to help because of her back problems.
Without adequate help, Mrs. Snyder attempts to do the housework like she used to, which makes her exhausted and frustrated. Without adequate help with her medication, she’s been in a good deal of pain. Although she does not want to go to a hospice facility, Mrs. Snyder and her family agree that this is the right choice.
Recommending that Mrs. Snyder go home was not a good choice. Yes, that was what she wanted—and ultimately, you couldn’t have stopped her from doing so if she insisted. But there were a number of red flags that indicated she wouldn’t be able to get the care she needed at home, like her daughter’s pregnancy and her son’s alcoholism. Now Mrs. Snyder will have to be moved yet again to hospice care, and as a case manager, it’s important to limit the number of times a patient is moved. Transitions are stressful and expensive, especially for patients who are terminally ill.
You should try the other option.
Recommendation Two
Recommend that Mrs. Snyder go to a hospice facility. There are too many red flags to recommend home hospice care.
Rebecca: (adamant) No! That’s not what I want. I want to go home.
Devorah: I know it’s going to be a challenge to care for my mother at home. But we’re ready for the challenge. We’re a family, and we’re not going to send my mother away.
Recommendation Three
Continue to recommend that Mrs. Snyder go to a hospice facility.
You provide evidence to Mrs. Snyder and her daughter that a hospice facility would be a better choice. You ask them to imagine what would happen if Devorah had to go on bedrest, or if her mother-in-law were unable to watch the children, or if Avi started drinking again. You explained that families can still be very involved with their families and discussed all the resources that are available at hospice facilities.
Mrs. Snyder is very unhappy with this conversation and asks to think about it. Later in the day, she tells you she and her family have decided that the hospice is the right decision. Devorah and Avi tell you that they are relieved by this decision because they both doubt their ability to care for their mother adequately.
Recommendation Four
Change your mind. A facility might be a better option, but it’s not appropriate to keep pushing the issue.
You help the Snyder family with the financial arrangements, and Mrs. Snyder goes home for hospice. Unfortunately, problems arise immediately. Devorah’s mother-in-law is not able to watch her children as often as she needs. In addition, there’s a good possibility that she’ll have to be back on bedrest soon. Avi also doesn’t come by as often as he is needed, probably because he is drinking again. Mrs. Snyder’s sister is unable to fly in to help because of her back problems.
Without adequate help, Mrs. Snyder attempts to do the housework like she used to, which makes her exhausted and frustrated. Without adequate help with her medication, she’s been in a good deal of pain. Although she does not want to go to a hospice facility, Mrs. Snyder and her family agree that this is the right choice.
Recommending that Mrs. Snyder go home was not a good choice. Yes, that was what she wanted—and ultimately, you couldn’t have stopped her from doing so if she insisted. But there were a number of red flags that indicated she wouldn’t be able to get the care she needed at home, like her daughter’s pregnancy and her son’s alcoholism. Now Mrs. Snyder will have to be moved yet again to hospice care, and as a case manager, it’s important to limit the number of times a patient is moved. Transitions are stressful and expensive, especially for patients who are terminally ill.
Recommendation Five
Keep Mrs. Snyder in the hospital until a space opens up in the Jewish hospice.
Denise: I’m going to stop you. You can’t keep Mrs. Snyder in the hospital indefinitely. I understand that you want to honor her wishes and send her to a Jewish facility. But unfortunately, the health care system doesn’t allow us to keep a patient hospitalized when hospice care is a far more appropriate option. I know Mrs. Snyder won’t be happy, but you’re going to have to look for a hospice that can accommodate the needs of an Orthodox Jewish patient.
Recommendation Six
Send Mrs. Snyder home until a space opens up in the Jewish hospice.
Denise: I’m going to stop you. This is not a good choice for two reasons. First, you’ve already established that Mrs. Snyder cannot get the care she needs at home. Second, it’s important the limit the number of transitions that a patient makes as much as possible. Transitions are expensive and difficult for the patient. Now, it’s possible Mrs. Snyder will refuse to go to a non-Jewish facility and go home against your advice—and you can’t stop her from doing that. But you can try to find an appropriate facility and reduce the number of times she has to move.
Recommendation Seven
Look for another hospice that might be able to accommodate an Orthodox Jewish patient.
Mrs. Snyder is not happy with your recommendation that she goes to a non-Jewish facility, and she threatens to go home. However, you promise her that you will do your very best to find her an appropriate facility where she can get kosher food and feel comfortable. She reluctantly relents.
Hospice Introduction Interviews
Listen to the hospice introductions.
Kathryn Marcus
Fern Hill Center
What can you tell Mrs. Snyder about your facility?
Kathryn: Mrs. Snyder, I know you’d prefer to go to a Jewish facility, but we’d be able to work with you and your family to meet your needs, religious and otherwise. At Fern Hill Center, we really pride ourselves in communicating with patients to make them as comfortable as possible, physically and emotionally. End-of-life care is definitely not a one-size-fits-all experience. We’ve had patients before who require a kosher diet…. actually, we have one now. We have kosher food brought in for him from a nearby Jewish hospice facility. If you’d like, I can see if one of this patient’s family members wouldn’t mind calling you and letting you know how their experience has been. Oh, and I see from your photos that you have a couple of dogs? They’re beautiful… I just love Golden Retrievers. If they’re well-behaved, we can arrange for them to visit you. We’ve just started doing pet visits recently, and our patients love that.
Father Miguel Rivera
St. Francis House
What can you tell Mrs. Snyder about your facility?
Father Rivera: Mrs. Snyder, we’d love to have you at St. Francis! We welcome people from many faiths and have had many Jewish patients. People who are not Catholic often choose St. Francis because we are a place that celebrates faith and spirituality. We have both a Catholic and a non-denominational chaplain on staff, and of course your rabbi can visit as well. We’re also one of the top-rated hospice facilities in the state. I brought you some pictures… would you like to see? You would have a beautiful and private room with a lovely view of the courtyard, and your room would be right outside of our aquarium. We have several cats that live in our facility and we bring in dogs almost every day to visit with the patients. Like I said, we’ve had many Jewish patients, although I don’t recall if we’ve had any Orthodox Jewish patients before who required a kosher diet. But I’m completely sure we can accommodate your dietary needs! We accommodate vegetarians, gluten free folks, a bunch of different kinds of allergies…kosher food won’t be a problem.
Hospice Facility Recommendation
Should you recommend St. Francis House or Fern Hill Center?
Recommendation One
St. Francis House
Mrs. Snyder goes to St. Francis House. She is comfortable there, but it is not without its problems. The center brings in kosher food that is of poor quality and not very nutritious, so Mrs. Snyder’s daughter has to bring in better food for her to eat. Mrs. Snyder does like being in an environment that is focused on faith and spirituality, but she does have an unpleasant encounter with another patient who is determined to convert her to Christianity. The family is pleased with the palliative care at St. Francis, but they generally feel that communication is weak and that this is not the best place for an Orthodox Jewish patient.
See what would have happened if you had chosen Fern Hill Center.
Recommendation Two
Fern Hill Center
Mrs. Snyder and her family are very pleased with the care she receives at Fern Hill Center. The kosher food that is arranged for her is excellent. The staff does an outstanding job communicating with the family about Mrs. Snyder’s needs. As a result, the staff takes special care to help Mrs. Snyder with her anxiety. In addition, her dogs are welcomed into the facility as daily guests—and they provide comfort to other patients as well. After a few weeks, Mrs. Snyder’s daughter calls the hospital to thank you for recommending such an excellent facility.
Conclusion
You have completed the Vila Health: Care Coordination II activity. In this activity, you had the opportunity to speak with Mrs. Snyder and her children, and to make decisions about her end-of-life care. In the courseroom, you will further address issues related to this case, including current laws and regulations and how these relate to the case.