CHALLENGES AND THREATS TO INDIGENOUS WOMEN’S IDENTITY Running head: CHALLENGES AND THREATS

CHALLENGES AND THREATS TO INDIGENOUS WOMEN’S IDENTITY
Running head: CHALLENGES AND THREATS TO INDIGENOUS WOMEN’S IDENTITY
Introduction
Do you know how many Aboriginal women are trafficked in Canada each year? Although indigenous women in Canada form four percent of the entire population, they constitute 50% of human trafficking victims (Roudometkina & Wakeford, 2018). Indigenous women are disproportionally facing numerous challenges and threats to their identity. They are discriminated against due to their gender and forced into precarious and dangerous economic and social conditions. Consequently, they have a higher risk of being victims of different kinds of violence and even being murdered (Roudometkina & Wakeford, 2018). The violence includes human trafficking and sexual abuse. Various governments have not addressed these concerns, including the Canadian government. In Canada, human trafficking is a domestic problem instead of the notion that the concept involves trafficking individuals internationally. The historical colonial sexualization of indigenous women’s bodies is still ongoing. When colonialists and indigenous people began interacting, the women’s authorities were dismissed. They perceived the indigenous women as unworthy and sexual, justifying violence against them. Consequently, racial violence, patriarchy, and colonialist white supremacy result in violence against these women (Roudometkina & Wakeford, 2018). Therefore, the society, government, and family structures should protect indigenous women as they should not be victims of culture and history.
The sources used in this research will detail the kinds of violence and abuse that indigenous women suffer. The research focuses on the Aboriginal culture in Canada and the plight of the women who are part of it. It will also explore the physical and psychological effects of these abuses and how the women are fighting to break the bias and create a conducive environment for their female offspring. The achievements of some women who belong to this community, such as Brenda Gunn, will be highlighted along with their efforts to help the women of their culture and other indigenous women. The research will also explore the errors in the documentation of missing and murdered Aboriginal women in Canada and the stifling of their political rights through the government’s silence on their suffering. Overall, the research hopes to find ways the indigenous women can be protected from harm through action, language, and policies.
 
 
 
References
Roudometkina, A., & Wakeford, K. (2018). Trafficking of Indigenous Women and Girls in Canada [eBook]. Retrieved 8 March 2022, from https://www.ourcommons.ca/Content/Committee/421/JUST/Brief/BR10002955/br-external/NativeWomensAssociationOfCanada-e.pdf.