Docherty-Skippen, S. M., & Woodford, E. D. (2017). Indigenous knowledge as 21st-century

Docherty-Skippen, S. M., & Woodford, E. D. (2017). Indigenous knowledge as 21st-century education: A taxonomy of 21st-century learning and educational leadership as Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit (IQ). Transformative Dialogues: Teaching & Learning Journal, 10(3), 1-15. Retrieved from https://journals.kpu.ca/index.php/td/article/download/801/285
In this article, the authors sought to develop a taxonomy that can help in integrating indigenous educational leadership with 21st-century learning in Canada. Their goal was to present a structure that the country’s public education system can adopt to address its pressing need for 21st-century educational leadership. This article is relevant to the intended study because it demonstrates how 21st-century educational settings can incorporate indigenous knowledge for improved outcomes by embracing creativity, innovation, and social responsibility. The authors named their system the Docherty-Woodford Taxonomy of 21st Education Learning and Leading Competencies as Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit (IQ), arguing that it permits every community member to participate in the educational context in diverse ways. The authors characterized their taxonomy as timely, relevant, and easy to implement because it shows how to bring together existing knowledge, which is an accurate assertion. After all, Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit is already in use in Nunavut.
Docherty-Skippen, S. M., & Woodford, E. D. (2017). Indigenous knowledge as 21st-century education: A taxonomy of 21st-century learning and educational leadership as Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit (IQ). Transformative Dialogues: Teaching & Learning Journal, 10(3), 1-15. Retrieved from https://journals.kpu.ca/index.php/td/article/download/801/285