ENG 203 Online: Introduction to World Literature

 
WRITING ASSIGNMENT #3: Creative Project
 
OVERVIEW
In this assignment, you will complete a creative project that thoughtfully responds to one course reading according to the directions below. The creative project consists of two parts: a creative piece and a reflection on the creative piece. Both parts are required and equally important to the assignment. The creative piece is worth 8 points and the reflection is worth 7 points, for a total of 15 possible points for the whole creative project.
You will choose which course text your creative project responds to. You can choose any one literary text assigned in this course through Week 13 with three exceptions: you may not choose Wilfred Owen’s poetry (the subject of Writing Assignment #1) and you may not choose either of the two texts you wrote on for Writing Assignment #2. For example, if you wrote Writing Assignment #2 on Daytripper and “The Cloak,” you cannot use either of those texts for Writing Assignment #3.
 
So, given the above exceptions, possible course texts for this assignment are as follows:

Liu Cixin, “The Poetry Cloud”
One assigned poem by Guillaume Apollinaire, Georg Trakl, Vera Brittain, or Carl Sandburg (the poetry covered in Week 4)
Gabriel Bá and Fábio Moon, Daytripper
The Epic of Gilgamesh
Nikolai Gogol, “The Cloak”
Nikolai Gogol, “The Mysterious Portrait”
Jocelyn Bioh, School Girls; Or, The African Mean Girls Play
Samuel Taylor Coleridge, “This Lime-Tree Bower, My Prison”
Samuel Taylor Coleridge, “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner”
Jamaica Kincaid, A Small Place

 
PART 1: CREATIVE PIECE
 
Your creative piece can respond to your chosen course text in one of two ways:
Option 1.     Write a pitch for an imagined adaptation of your chosen text in a different medium and set in a different time and/or place than the original text; the pitch will take the form of a letter to a production/publishing/media company; your pitch must be 400 words minimum and 500 words maximum
Option 2.     Write a piece of literature of your own—either a poem, piece of short fiction, short scene in play format, or a letter—inspired by your chosen text; the maximum length of your piece is 500 words; if you write a piece of short fiction, a play scene, or a letter, your piece must be 400 words minimum; there is no minimum word count if you choose to write a poem, but it must be at least 14 lines long and we expect that your poem’s language, length, and structure will be thoughtful, carefully chosen, and meaningful
Instructions & suggestions for each option:
 
Option 1: If you choose the pitch option, then remember that a pitch is meant to be persuasive and to convince someone (in this case, a production/publishing/media company) to support your vision for the project. Your adaptation can be in any possible artistic medium except the one the original text is in; possible mediums include, but are not limited to: a film, a miniseries, a TV show, a video game, a museum exhibit, a novel, a graphic novel, a short story, a poem, and a play. Remember that every adaptation changes—that is, adapts—the original text in some way; some aspects of the original text may stay the same in your adaptation, and other aspects of the original text may change in your adaptation.
Questions to consider include: When and where will your adaptation be set? Do you want to update the original text and set it in the modern day or in a different time period? How would such changes in setting affect the characters and story? Perhaps you want to pitch a novel version of School Girls. How would you expand the story presented in such a short play to fill a whole novel? Perhaps you want to pitch a video game version of Gilgamesh. What genre would the game be? What characters, choices, or mechanics would the game contain? Would there be different levels to work through? Perhaps you want to pitch a film version of “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner.” What genre of film would it be? What kind of special effects might it include? What kind of camera shots might it include?
 
Option 2: If you choose the literature option, then your artistic creation (poem, short fiction, play scene, letter) must, in some way, respond to some aspect of the original text. Perhaps you want to write a poem about beauty pageants or high school friends inspired by the representation of those elements in School Girls. Perhaps you want to write a short piece of fiction imagining what happens to the Wedding Guest after the end of “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner.” Perhaps you want to write a personal letter to Jamaica Kincaid, sharing your thoughts about tourism or empire in response to A Small Place. Perhaps you want to write a short dramatic scene inspired by specific pages or panels in Daytripper. Perhaps you want to rewrite the ending of “The Poetry Cloud” as a poem or short story. Whatever you decide, your artistic creation should clearly and thoughtfully respond to the original text by extending, adapting, complementing, or drawing inspiration from some aspect of the text.
 
PART 2: REFLECTION
Your written reflection on your creative piece must be a minimum of 500 words and a maximum of 700 words. This reflection is a crucial part of this assignment. It is worth nearly half of the assignment grade (7 points out of the 15 points total for this assignment), and it also will help guide us as we read and grade the creative portion of your assignment.
In your reflection, you must do all of the following:
1) Briefly explain your creative piece (which option you chose and why)
2) Briefly explain your process for creating the piece (how did you decide upon your chosen text and how did you brainstorm, compose, and finalize your creative piece)
3) Explain your creative piece’s engagement with the original text (how does it reimagine, respond to, build on, critique, or otherwise engage with the original text)
4) Reflect on what you learned about the original text as a result of working on this assignment
GRADING & RUBRIC
All writing assignments will be graded based on a rubric. Both the creative piece and reflection are graded and represented on the rubric (see the Writing Assignment #3 Rubric for details). The rubric is available on Canvas and students are encouraged to look it over carefully during the composition of their assignment. The creative piece is worth 8 points and the reflection is worth 7 points, for a total of 15 possible points for the whole creative project (half points are possible).
REQUIRED LENGTH
If you choose the pitch option (Option 1), your pitch must be 400 words minimum and 500 words maximum. If you choose the literature option (Option 2) and if you write a piece of short fiction, a play scene, or a letter, your piece must be 400 words minimum and 500 words maximum. Poetry tends to be a more concise form; therefore, there is no minimum word count if you choose to write a poem, but it must be at least 14 lines long and we expect that your poem’s language, length, and structure will be thoughtful, carefully chosen, and meaningful. The written reflection must be a minimum of 500 words and a maximum of 700 words.
FORMAT & SUBMISSION
In the upper-left-hand corner of the first page, place your header information on four different lines: your name, instructors’ names, course name, and date. Then put your creative piece, followed by your reflection. Both parts of this project—the creative piece and the reflection—must be included in one text document (such as a Word document or PDF). The whole document must be typed, double-spaced, and written in 12-point Times, Times New Roman, Calibri, or Arial font with one-inch margins on all sides. The one exception to the double-spaced requirement is if you are writing a poem for your creative piece: your poem may or may not be double spaced—your choice. Before you submit your project, take time to proofread it as your writing should be polished, clear, and free of errors. To receive credit for this assignment, students must upload one document—that includes the creative piece and the reflection—to the Writing Assignment #3 link in the Week 14 module in Canvas. You cannot submit your document as an attachment to a submission comment. The student is solely responsible to make sure their assignment has been submitted correctly.
DUE DATE & LATE WORK
This writing assignment is due on Sunday, April 24 at 11:59 p.m.  By this date and time, your assignment needs to be submitted via the submission link in the Week 14 Module folder. To be graded and receive credit, your assignment must follow the guidelines and requirements outlined above. Please read the guidelines carefully before submitting. Late projects will only be accepted for 72 hours immediately following the due date and time, meaning the late deadline is Wednesday, April 27 at 11:59 p.m. The late deadline is the final deadline. All late assignments will receive a 1-point deduction for lateness.
 
SUPPORT & EXTRA CREDIT
If you have questions about this assignment, you can ask them in the designated Q & A Forum in the Week 14 Module in Canvas. Remember that you can earn extra credit by attending a Writing Center appointment to work on this assignment (see syllabus for details).