For this activity, you will create two designs for the same project.

For this activity, you will create two designs for the same project. For example, you might choose to create a CD cover for your favorite band’s newest release, or you might want to design a menu for the local deli.
Be sure to save both of your designs. Scan or take a picture of the design that wasn’t created in an No matter what you decide for your subject matter, the two designs must involve different media. One of these media will be an image-editing program, such as Inkscape. You will learn more about the basic tools available in Inkscape later in this lesson.
The two designs should incorporate different techniques. For example, you might make one design abstract, while making the other more realistic.
image-editing program. You will submit this item later in this lesson as your portfolio item.
You may choose to use Inkscape as your image-editing software for this assignment.
Open a new document in Inkscape. You can access the View menu (V) in order to change the zoom level or to add grid lines to the file while you work.
Adding Shapes
What shapes will form the basis of your design? In Inkscape, select one of the following options to get started:
Create rectangles and squares (F4)
Create circles, ellipses, and arcs (F5)
Create stars and polygons (*)
Create spirals (F9)
Add the shapes you would like to include in your cover design. Use the handles to resize the shapes, and check out the settings in the Tool Controls bar above the canvas.
For more information about customizing shapes in Inkscape, access Help → Tutorials → Inkscape: Shapes.
Selecting Colors
In Inkscape, you can easily change the color of an element by selecting it and then selecting a color swatch from the palette below the canvas.
The Fill and Stroke menu (Shift+Ctrl+F) provides many options for you to customize. You can select a color by its RGBA value, HSL value, or even from a color wheel. You can also control whether the color has a gradient or how transparent the color is.
For more information about selecting colors, access Help → Tutorials → Inkscape: Basic. Scroll down to the Fill and stroke section.
You can easily move elements in Inkscape by clicking and dragging. You can also select an element and use the arrow keys.
If you click on a shape once in Inkscape, handles will appear at each corner or edge with arrows pointing outward. You can scale or resize the shapes by dragging these handles.
If you click on a shape twice, handles will appear pointing parallel to the sides of the shape. You can rotate the shape by dragging these handles.
If you wish to stack elements, or move elements on top of or underneath each other, you can select the Z-order menu. Select the arrow icon or press F1 to access the Select and Transform Objects tool. A toolbar will appear above the canvas with options that will allow you to move elements upward or downward in the stacking order.
For more information about positioning elements in Inkscape, access Help → Tutorials → Inkscape: Basic. Scroll down to the Moving, scaling, rotating and Z-order sections.
Creating Lines
The Stroke style portion of the Fill and Stroke menu allows you to control the width and style of the outlines of any shapes you have created.
appear above the canvas with options that will allow you to move elements upward or downward in the stacking order.
Lines are known as paths in Inkscape. You can use the feature Draw freehand lines (F6) to draw freely, or you can create smoother lines using the Draw Bezier curves and straight lines feature (Shift+F6).
Once you have created lines or paths, you may wish to edit them. Edit paths by nodes (F2) provides you with a great deal of control over each segment of the line or path.
For more information about positioning elements in Inkscape, access Help → Tutorials → Inkscape: Advanced. Scroll down to the Drawing freehand and regular paths and Editing paths sections.