P280003 P280003 The Effect of Covid 19 and Lockdown on Students Engagement

P280003
P280003
The Effect of Covid 19 and Lockdown on Students Engagement
Module Code: FC301
Class/Group: FCB
Module Title: Statistics
Assessment Type: Investigation
Module Tutor Name:
Student ID Number:
Date of Submission:
Word Count: 1,500
I confirm that this assignment is my own work. Where I have referred to academic sources, I have provided in-text citations and included the sources in the final reference list.
Table of Contents
Summary ……………………..…………………………………………………………………….3
1: Introduction ……………………………………………………………………………………..3
1.2 Limitation: ……………………………………………………………………………………..3
2 Literature Review ……………………………………………………………………………….4
2.1: Pakistan Analysis …………………………………………………………………………..4
3: Methods ………………………………………………………………………………………….4
3.1: Data Collection of Methods Used 4
3.2 Data Collection of Questionnaires Types: 5
4: Results of Combination between Various types of Questionnaires 6
4.1: Question 1 and 2 …………………………………………………………………………….6
4.2: Question 2 and 3 …………………………………………………………………………….7
4.3: Question 2 and 4 …………………………………………………………………………….7
4.4: Question 2 and 8 …………………………………………………………………………….8
5: Calculations of Cumulative frequency and Co Variance ……………………………….8
5.1: Question 1 ……………………………………………………………………………………9
Co Variance: ……………………………………………………………………………………….9
5.2: Question 2 …………………………………………………………………………………..10
5.3: Question 3 ……………………………………………………………………………………11
5.4: Question 4 …………………………………………………………………………………..12
Co Variance: ……………………………………………………………………………………..13
5.5: Question 5 …………………………………………………………………………………..13
6 Discussion on Combined Various Questionnaires …………………………………….14
6.1: Relationship Between Question 2 and 4 ………………………………………………15
6.2: Relationship Between Question 2 and 8 ………………………………………………15
6.3: Relationship Between Question 2 and 3 ………………………………………………15
6.4: Relationship Between Question 1 and 2 ………………………………………………16
7: Discussion on Cumulative Frequency and Covariance ……………………………..16
7.1: Question 1 Cumulative Frequency and Percentage …………………………………16
Question 1 Covariance: ………………………………………………………………………..16
7.2: Question 2 Cumulative Frequency and Percentage …………………………………16
7.3: Question 3 Cumulative Frequency and Percentage …….…………………………..17
7.4: Question 4 Cumulative Frequency and Percentage …………………………………17
7.5: Question 5 Covariance ……………………………………………………………………17
8 Conclusion: …………………………………………………………………………………….17
9: Appendix Survey, Count and Percentage ……………………………………………….18
Alphabetical References List …………………………………………………………………32
Summary
The aim of this report analysis is investigating the effect of student’s online learning engagement during the Covid 19 global pandemic by measuring a cumulative frequency graph and co variance to present an evaluation between participation and engagement. The interpretation will take place by using quartiles survey questionnaires, along with combining several questionnaires to represent the relationship among them. In order to present efficient and reliable information, 129 responses have been collected that indicate a large sample size. All graphs and calculations have been done through Microsoft excel.
1: Introduction
Students of all age groups adapt to face-to-face learning; however, after the Covid 19 lockdown, they have been forced to remain at home. Students from various schools and universities use different educational applications to proceed with education (Chu, 2020). The engagement has been weakened. This action occurred because of the social distancing environmental process. Throughout a student’s academic years, engagement is a crucial part of learning; engagement characterises and enhances an individual’s strengths with communications skills and comprehension of complicated subjects. Student engagement may inhibit social difficulties and improve personal traits, hence, encourage them to achieve outstanding results (Borup, et al., 2020). Face-to-face classes prevent students from being unengaged because of the virtual learning area that supports every individual student to engage in lessons.
1.2 Limitation:
The data collection and analysis report were limited to be completed within three weeks’ time. Due to the worldwide pandemic, the limitation movement was concluded through an online Qualtiles survey. This survey respected ethical considerations by offering the participants answers to be confidential and anonymous. The only thing that could be shown within the survey are the participants percentage upon answering the questionnaires. The data collection reliability is appropriately accurate to distinguish the virtual learning area and engagement participation of online learning. Another reason that contributes to this investigation being valid and reliable is because while the survey has been sent out, it was strict providing rules upon gaining responses from university or school students only. This survey respects valuable information, therefore, it would not jeopardise individuals’ answers by manipulating them to change their minds with answers. Meaning, the participants’ names have not been shown to reduce participants’ interference in another individual’s answer.
2 Literature Review
2.1: Pakistan Analysis
There has been a statistical investigation that represents similarity to this research analysis. The investigation was based on examining the effect of students’ engagement and satisfaction during covid 19 in Pakistan college. The research investigates the impact of online learning that might disturb and permit students in disengaging with studies. The researchers have used variables to support their findings. Therefore, the research results showed that students may not engage as they used to during face to face classes, this represents that online learning may have a bad influence in students educational career (Shehzadi, et al., 2020).
3: Methods
3.1: Data Collection of Methods Used
The report analysis will be using a snowball method to measure students’ engagement in online learning during Covid 19. A snowball sampling method is used to represent an efficient amount of people to demonstrate specific data analysed by the population. Researchers often use snowball methods to present reliable information taken by representatives to illustrate the majority opponent’s population. Circumstantially, due to worldwide pandemic research, studies have used this type of research method to establish precise data analysis; thus, this method may efficiently produce and navigate results without cost or social interactions (Naderifar, Goli, and Ghaljaie, 2017). This report has proposed a large efficient amount of sample size by obtaining 129 responses to collect data. Data has been collected using questionnaires through quartiles survey. The survey was transferred to student group chats on Whatsapp and ordered them to forward the survey to their friends’ alternative group. The cumulative frequencies and co variance graphs will demonstrate the decreasing amount of insufficient engagement skills during the global pandemic.
3.2 Data Collection of Questionnaires Types:
This statistical analysis has provided various questionnaire types to not bore the participants and to prevent close ended or misleading questionnaires. The questionnaires were established through multiple choices of more than a single answer within the answer’s choice, and matrix percentage scale to give the participants the opportunity of distinguishing their thoughts upon numerical scale. Thus, providing agreement, disagree, and sometimes matrix for multiple questionnaires and viewing their comments. In addition, several questionnaires will be combined to present the relation between them through the students’ online engagement. The two questionnaires will present clarity on how student engagement and participation is inefficient during online learning. (full and completed survey will be further shown in appendix section):
Are you experiencing difficulties while engaging and participating?
Were you ever afraid to respond to your teacher because you were not engaged in the lesson?
4: Results of Combination between Various types of Questionnaires
4.1: Question 1 and 2
Bad
Probably yes
Probably not
Okay
87.00%
13.00%
Good
69.20%
30.80%
35.70%
74.30%
4.2: Question 2 and 3
Yes, because I have connection issues.
Probably yes
Probably not
Sometimes, my house might be too noisy to engage and unmute myself.
90.0%
10.0%
No, my virtual learning area is more than good to keep me comfortably engaged.
63.1%
36.9%
50.0%
50.0%
4.3: Question 2 and 4
Both are great.
Bad
Okay
Good
Face to face
4.80%
35.40%
40.00%
Online learning
85.70%
56.90%
25.70%
9.50%
7.70%
34.30%
4.4: Question 2 and 8
Yes
Probably yes
Probably not
Maybe
52.70%
30.60%
No
29.70%
32.70%
17.60%
40.80%
5: Calculations of Cumulative frequency and Co Variance
5.1: Question 1
Degree of satisfaction from online learning.
Frequency
Cumulative Frequency
Percentage
Cumulative Percentage
Bad (1)
23
23
18.60%
18.60%
Okay (2)
66
89
53.20%
71.80%
Good (3)
35
124
28.20%
100.00%
Co Variance:
5.2: Question 2
Difficulties experienced while engaging and participating
Frequency
Cumulative Frequency
Percentage
Cumulative percentage
Probably yes
74
74
60.20%
60.20%
Probably no
49
123
39.80%
100.00%
5.3: Question 3
Virtual Learning influence on engaging comfortably.
Frequency
Cumulative Frequency
Percentage
Cumulative Percentage
Yes, Because I have connection issues.
10
10
8.20%
8.20%
Sometimes, my house might be too noisy to engage and unmute myself.
65
75
52.80%
61.00%
No, my virtual learning area is more than good to keep me engaged comfortably.
48
123
39.00%
100.00%
5.4: Question 4
Learning preference method
Frequency
Cumulative Frequency
Percentage
Cumulative Percentage
Face to face
38
38
31.40%
31.40%
Both are great
64
102
52.90%
84.30%
Online learning
19
121
15.70%
100.00%
Co Variance:
5.5: Question 5
Learning Preference Method
Frequency
Cumulative Frequency
Percentage
Cumulative Percentage
face to face (1)
38
38
31.40%
31.40%
Both are great (2)
64
102
52.90%
84.30%
Online learning (3)
19
121
15.70%
100.00%
6 Discussion on Combined Various Questionnaires
6.1: Relationship Between Question 2 and 4
There is a strong statistically significant relationship between the learning method preference and the degree of satisfaction from online learning. 80% of the students that found online learning experience bad preferred face to face learning. Whereas, students that had good online learning experience preferred the online method more than face to face.
Pattern Identified:
As the number of students that found online learning good is decreasing, and the number of students that prefer the online learning method face to face decreases as well.
6.2: Relationship Between Question 2 and 8
The graph indicates that students experiencing difficulties while engaging and participating are more terrified to respond to teachers than those who are not facing these difficulties.
Pattern Identified:
As the number of students facing difficulties while engaging and participating increased, the number of students that were afraid to respond to the teacher questions have been increasing.
6.3: Relationship Between Question 2 and 3
The influence of virtual learning areas on the comfort of engagement and experiencing difficulties while engaging and participating shown relation. The students who considered their virtual learning area uncomfortable faced 90% difficulties in engaging and participating.
Pattern Identified:
As the virtual area gets more comfortable, the percentage of students that face difficulties in engaging and participating is decreasing.
6.4: Relationship Between Question 1 and 2
The degree of satisfaction from online learning and the difficulties experienced while engaging and participating demonstrated relation. The students that found the online learning bad were 87% that experienced difficulties of engagement and participation. On the other side, 73% of the students that found online learning good probably did not face difficulties.
Pattern Identified:
As the number of students facing difficulties while engaging and participating decreased, the number of students that found the online learning good increased.
7: Discussion on Cumulative Frequency and Covariance
7.1: Question 1 Cumulative Frequency and Percentage
89 out of 124 students found the degree of satisfaction from online learning less than efficient. In reference to the percentage perspective, this could be calculated as 71.8% of the students from the survey.
Question 1 Covariance:
The covariance is presenting a positive indication that represents a positive relationship between the degree of satisfaction and the number of students. Therefore, the trend is the number of students increasing satisfaction degrees.
7.2: Question 2 Cumulative Frequency and Percentage
74 out of 123 students have faced difficulties while engaging and participating. In reference to the percentage perspective, this could be calculated as 60.2% of the students from the survey.
7.3: Question 3 Cumulative Frequency and Percentage
75 out of 123 students declared that they faced discomfort in their virtual learning area while trying to engage and participate. In reference to the percentage perspective, this could be calculated as 61% of the students from the survey.
7.4: Question 4 Cumulative Frequency and Percentage
54 out of 125 students declared that they were afraid to respond to the teacher, because they were not engaged. In reference to the percentage perspective, this could be calculated as 43.2% of the students from the survey.
Question 5 Cumulative Frequency and Percentage:
Only 19 out of 121 of the students declared that they preferred the online learning method rather than the face to face method. In reference to the percentage perspective, this may be calculated as 15.7% of the students from the survey.
7.5: Question 5 Covariance
The covariance is negative and indicates a negative relationship between the preference of online learning method and the number of students. Therefore, the trend is the number of students being lower for the preference of the online learning method.
8 Conclusion:
To sum up, 71.8% of the students who answered the survey found the degree of satisfaction from online learning less than efficient. This could be attributed to the difficulties faced by more than 60.2% of them while engaging and participating. Hence, these difficulties caused students to be more afraid to respond to the teacher’s questions. The discomfort encountered in the virtual learning area while engaging could be the reason behind the difficulties faced as to 61% of the students who declared facing discomfort while engaging. Ultimately, it might be recognised that students that prefered the online learning method rather than the face to face method are less than 15.7% of the students in the survey. In reference to the percentage descriptions, 71.8% of the students participants in the survey found the degree of satisfaction from online learning less than good. This could be attributed to difficulties faced by more than 60.2% of them while engaging and participating. These difficulties may have caused students to be more terrified to respond back to teachers’ questions. The discomfort encountered in the virtual learning area while engaging could be the reason behind the difficulties faced as 61% of the students declared that they faced discomfort while engaging.
9: Appendix Survey, Count and Percentage
Q1: How is your online learning?
Count
Bad
23
Okay
66
Good
35
Total
124
Q1: How is your online learning?
Percent of Data
Bad
18.50%
Okay
53.20%
Good
28.20%
Total
100
Q2: Are you experiencing difficulties while engaging and participating?
Count
Probably yes
74
Probably not
49
Total
123
Q2: Are you experiencing difficulties while engaging and participating?
Percent of Data
Probably yes
60.20%
Probably not
39.80%
Total
100
Q3: Whenever my phone vibrates I am able to mute it and engage with my class without having the urge to check my notifications.
Yes, I am willing to prioritise my time.
No, I could just ask a friend later.
Yes, I have to improve my marks.
No, I get distracted easily.
Total
Agree
39
33
63
45
180
Sometimes
70
53
39
55
217
Disagree
11
30
16
20
77
Total
120
116
118
120
474
Q3:Whenever my phone vibrates I am able to mute it and engage with my class without having the urge to check my notifications.
count
Agree
180
Sometimes
217
Disagree
77
Total
474
Whenever my phone vibrates I am able to mute it and engage with my class without having the urge to check my notifications.
percentage
Agree
37.97
Sometimes
45.78
Disagree
16.24
Total
100
Q4:On a scale of 0 to 100, how is your engagement performance in online learning?
Count
Better than face to face.
117
Everything is much complicated.
117
I am willing to keep everything as normal as possible.
118
Total
352
Q4 :On a scale of 0 to 100, how is your engagement performance in online learning?
percentage
Better than face to face.
33.23
Everything is much complicated.
33.23
I am willing to keep everything as normal as possible.
33.54
Total
100
Q5: Have you ever done your online classes inside the car?
Count
Yes
42
No
81
Total
123
Q5: Have you ever done your online classes inside the car?
Percent of Data
Yes
34.10%
No
65.90%
Total
100.00%
Q6: While doing your classes inside the car, how was your engagement?
Count
Efficient, I could be relaxed and avoid distractions.
14
Unsatisfactory, I am driving the car for an important event.
29
I have never done my classes inside the car.
79
Total
122
Q6: While doing your classes inside the car, how was your engagement?
Percent of Data
Efficient, I could be relaxed and avoid distractions.
11.50%
Unsatisfactory, I am driving the car for an important event.
23.80%
I have never done my classes inside the car.
64.80%
Total
100
Q7: How many times did your teacher or professor call your name and you did not respond?
Count
2-4 times.
45
None
14
I always answer back.
64
Total
123
Q7: How many times did your teacher or professor call your name and you did not respond?
Percent of Data
2-4 times.
36.60%
None
11.40%
I always answer back.
52.00%
Total
100
Q8: Were you ever afraid to respond to your teacher because you were not engaged in the lesson?
Count
Yes
54
Maybe
38
No
33
Total
125
Q8: Were you ever afraid to respond to your teacher because you were not engaged in the lesson?
Percent of Data
Yes
43.20%
Maybe
30.40%
No
26.40%
Total
100.00%
Q9: Is your virtual learning area not allowing you to engage comfortably?
Count
Yes, because I have connection issues.
10
No, my virtual learning area is more than good to keep me engaged comfortably.
48
Sometimes, my house might be too noisy to engage and unmute myself.
65
Total
123
Q9: Is your virtual learning area not allowing you to engage comfortably?
Percent of Data
Yes, because I have connection issues.
8.20%
No, my virtual learning area is more than good to keep me engaged comfortably.
39.00%
Sometimes, my house might be too noisy to engage and unmute myself.
52.80%
Total
100.00%
Q10: Do you prefer face to face learning or online learning?
Count
Both are great.
38
Face to face.
64
Online learning.
19
Total
121
Q10: Do you prefer face to face learning or online learning?
Percent of Data
Both are great.
31.40%
Face to face.
52.90%
Online learning.
15.70%
Total
100
Alphabetical References List
Borup, J., Jensen, M., Archambault, L., Short, C.R. and Graham, C.R. (2020) Supporting Students During Covid-19: Developing and Leveraging Academic Communities of Engagement in a Time of Crisis. Technology and Teacher Education [online]. 2 (28), pp. 161-169. [Accessed 17 February 2021].
Chu, A. (2020) Applying Positive Psychology to Foster Student Engagement and Classroom Community Amid the Covid-19 Pandemic and Beyond. Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Psychology [online]. 1-23 [Accessed 17 February 2021].
Naderifar, M., Goli, H. and Ghaljaie, F. (2017) Snowball Sampling: A Purposeful Method of Sampling in Qualitative Research. Strides in Development of Medical Education [online]. 3 (14), pp. 1-4. [Accessed 19 February 2021].
Shehzadi, S., Nisar, Q.A., Hussain, M.S., Basheer, M.F., Hameed, W.U. and Chaudhry, N.I. (2020) The Role of Digital Learning Toward Students’ Satisfaction and University Brand Image at Educational Institutes of Pakistan: A Post-effect of Covid-19. Digital Learning and University Brand Image [online]., pp. 1-19. [Accessed 28 February 2021].
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