paper on Early and Middle Adulthood POINTS: 30. LENGTH: 12 pages, excluding

paper on Early and Middle Adulthood
POINTS: 30.
LENGTH: 12 pages, excluding cover page, references, and appendix (if applicable).
FORMAT: Double-spaced, Times New Roman and 12-point size font, APA format. You must use at least 7 references from the required reading lists. Please name your file as “
 
Please respond to 4 prompts below. Each response to a prompt should be around 3 pages Please copy and paste a question and put your corresponding answer right after the question. Your answers should be clear, succinct and concise. Evidence of readings should be included in each response. Avoid direct quotations from readings, but rather pull ideas from them and integrate them, along with your own critical thinking.
 
Prompts:
(5 points) Summarize the bio, psycho, and social development and their interaction during early adulthood in a way best benefiting your learning, e.g. a table, bullet points, mind figure, mind map, or a combination of any, etc.
(10 points) Summarize the bio, psycho, and social development and their interaction during middle adulthood in a way best benefiting your learning, e.g. a table, bullet points, mind figure, mind map, or a combination of any, etc.
(6 points) Do you think online dating (fully online, no offline/in-person contact) can form adult attachment? If no, why? If yes, does it have the same quality as adult attachment formed via offline/in-person dating and why?
(9 points) This prompt will be based on the movie July Rhapsody (2002).
1) Describe Lam Yiu-kwok’s biological and psychological status. Also, consider strengths and resilience factors.
2) Comment about the family state: communication style between family members; presence and quality of love between husband and wife; relationship between father and son.
3) How does social context impact mid-life crisis of Lam Yiu-kwok?
Reading materials are as follows for your references
Week 6 Early Adulthood – Biological and Psychological Development
Early adulthood is marked by both opportunities and challenges that stem from various micro and macro sources. The following required and recommended readings examine the biological and psychological aspects involved phase of the developmental process, such as the strengthening of personal identity this in relation to existing and rising social challenges, and the forming intimate relationships.
Identify biological changes that accompany early adulthood development
Identify and explain the Eriksonian psychosocial stage that pertains to early adulthood development.
Describe attachment theory as it pertains to adulthood.
Discuss biological and psychological issues that may present challenges in early adulthood.
Required Readings
Antonucci, T.C., Akiyama, H., & Takahashi, K. (2004). Attachment and close relationships across the span of Life. .Attachment & Human Development, 6, 353-370.doi: 10.1080/1461673042000303136
Basham, K. (2008). Homecoming as safe haven of the new front: Attachment and detachment in military couples. Clinical Social Work Journal,36 (1), 83-96.doi: 10.1007/s10615-007-0138-9
Berzoff, J. (2016). Psychosocial ego development: The theory of Erik Erikson. In J. Berzoff, Flanagan, L., & Hertz, P. (Eds.), Inside out and outside in: Psychodynamic clinical theory and practice in contemporary multi-cultural contexts. (4th ed, pp. 100-122). Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson.* Read only pages pertinent to adulthood.
Kefalas, M.J., Furstenberg, F.F., Carr, P.J., & Napolitano, L. (2011). Marriage is more than being together: The meaning of marriage for young adults. Journal of Family Issues, 32(7), 845-875. doi: 10.1177/0192513X10397277
Rogers, A. T. (2019). Chapter 10. Development in Early Adulthood. In Human Behavior in the Social Environment: Perspectives on Development and the Life Course (5th ed.). New York, NY: Routledge.
Sable, P. (2008). What is adult attachment? Clinical Social Work Journal, 36, 21-30.doi: 10.1007/s10615-007-0110-8
Recommended Readings
Barrenger, S.L., Draine, J., Angell, B., & Herman . (2017). Reincarceration risk among men with mental illnesses leaving prison: A risk environment analysis. Community Mental Health Journal, 1-10. doi: 10.1007/s10597-017-0113-z
McPhail, B.A. (2004). Questioning gender and sexuality binaries: What queer theorists, transgendered individuals, and sex researchers can teach social work. Journal of Gay and Lesbian Social Services, 17(1), 37-41.doi:10.1300/J041v17n01_02
Smith, T. B. & Silva, L. (2011). Ethnic identity and personal well-being of people of color: A meta-analysis. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 58(1), 42-60. doi:10.1037/a0021528
Umberson, D., Williams, K., Thomas, P.A., Liu, H., & Thomeer, M.B. (2014). Race, gender and chains of disadvantage: Childhood adversity, social relationships, and health. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 55(1), 20-38. doi: 10.1177/0022146514521426
Resources
Girme, Y.U., Overall, N.C., Faingataa, S., & Sibley, C.G. (2015). Happily single: The link between relationship status and well-being depends on avoidance and approach social goals. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 1-9. doi: 10.1177/1948550615599828
Week 7 Early Adulthood – Development in the Social Environment
Readings focus primarily on social and cultural factors that are particularly significant in the early adulthood stage of development. Some of topics will be familiar, such as family, parenthood, and mental health, since they were reviewed in relation to earlier stages. However there are now different nuances to examine and assess within each of these areas.
Describe the social environmental issues that impact early adulthood.
Identify significant events/milestones that occur during early adulthood.
Describe the changes that may take place in the family system.
Required Readings
Grollman, E.A. (2014). Multiple disadvantaged statuses and health: The role of multiple forms of discrimination. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 55(1), 3-19. doi: 10.1177/0022146514521215
Lavner, J., Waterman, J., & Peplau, L.A. (2014). Parent adjustment over time in gay, lesbian, and heterosexual parent families adopting from foster care. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 84(1), 46-53. doi: 10.1037/h0098853
Leavell, A. S., Tamis-LeMonda, C. S., Ruble, D. N., Zosuls, K. M., & Cabrera, N. J. (2012). African American, white, and Latino fathers’ activities with their sons and daughters in early childhood. Sex Roles, 66(1-2), 53-65. doi:10.1007/s11199-011-0080-8
Mersky, J.P., Topitze, J., & Reynolds, A.J. (2013). Impacts of adverse childhood experiences on health, mental health, and substance use in early adulthood: A cohort of urban, minority sample in the US. Child Abuse & Neglect, 37, 917-925. doi: org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2013.07.011
Thoits, P.A. (2011). Mechanisms linking social ties and support to physical and mental health. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 52(2), 145-161. doi: 10.1177/0022146510395592
Recommended Readings
Haney, C. (2012). Prison effects of in the age of mass incarceration. The Prison Journal. doi: 10.1177/0032885512448604
Hawkins, R. L. (2010). Fickle families and the kindness of strangers: Social capital in the lives of low-income single mothers. Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, 20(1), 38-55. doi:10.1080/10911350903183263
McGoldrick, M., Broken Nose, M.A., & Potenza, M. (2016).Violence and the family life cycle. In B. Carter & M. McGoldrick (Eds.), The expanded family life cycle: Individual, family and social perspectives (pp. 470-491). Boston: Allyn and Bacon.
Settersten, R. A., Jr., Day, J. K., Cancel-Tirado, D., &Driscoll, D. M. (2014). Fathers’ accounts of struggle and growth in early adulthood: An exploratory study of disadvantaged men. In K. Roy & N. Jones (Eds.), Pathways to adulthood for disconnected young men in low-income communities. New Directions in Child and Adolescent Development, 143, 73–89.
Resources
Pew Report: http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2014/09/24/record-share-of-americans-have-never-married/
Week 8 Middle Adulthood – Biological Development
Middle adulthood spans many years. There are different ideas as to when it begins and ends, which usually depend on health, culture, life expectancy and social circumstances. The first of the three lessons on middle adulthood will review biological factors, such as health and sexuality.
Identify the physiological changes that accompany middle adulthood.
Describe the emotional issues that may arise due to the physiological changes that take place during middle adulthood.
Required Readings
Augustus-Horvath, C.L., & Tylka, T.L. (2011). The acceptance model of intuitive eating: A comparison of women in emerging adulthood, early adulthood, and middle adulthood. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 58(1), 100-125. doi: 10.1037/a0022129
DeLyser (2012). At midlife, intentionally childfree women and their experiences of regret. Journal of Clinical Social Work, 40(1), 66-74. doi: 10.1007/s10615-011-0337-2
Rogers, A. T. (2019). Chapter 11. Development in Middle Adulthood. In Human Behavior in the Social Environment: Perspectives on Development and the Life Course (5th ed.). New York, NY: Routledge.
Recommended Readings
Calhoun, H., & McEvatt, L. (2005). Urban black women at midlife: A counseling perspective. Journal of Women and Aging, 17(4), 43-57. doi:10.1300/J074v17n04_04
Goldstein, E.G. (2005). Chapters 1-4. In When the bubble bursts: Clinical perspectives on midlife issues. Hillsdale, NJ: Analytic Press
Larson, N.C. (2006). Becoming “one of the girls”: The transition to lesbian in midlife. Affilia, 21(3), 296-305. doi:10.1177/0886109906288911
Raphael, D. (2011). Poverty in childhood and adverse health outcomes in adulthood. Maturitas, 69(1), 22-26. doi:10.1016/j.maturitas.2011.02.011
Week 9 Middle Adulthood – Psychological Development
Middle adulthood spans many years. There are different ideas as to when it begins and ends, which usually depend on health, culture, life expectancy and social circumstances. The second of the three lessons on middle adulthood will review psychological factors.
Identify and explain the Eriksonian psychosocial stage that pertains to middle adulthood development
Reflect on the meaning of “midlife crises”.
Required Readings
Bates, D.D. (2010). Once-married African-American lesbians and bisexual women: Identity development and the coming-out process. Journal of Homosexuality, 57(2),197-225. doi: 10.1080/00918360903488848
Bookwala, J. (2012). Marriage and other partnered relationships in middle and late adulthood. In R. Blieszner & V.H. Bedford (Eds.), Handbook of Families and Aging (pp. 91-123). Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, LLC.
Hardy, Kenneth. (2015, November/December). The view from Black America. Listening to the untold stories. Psychotherapy Networker. Retrieved from http://www.psychotherapynetworker.org/daily/posts/professional-development/the-view-from-black-america/
Rogers, A. T. (2019). Chapter 11. Development in Middle Adulthood. In Human Behavior in the Social Environment: Perspectives on Development and the Life Course (5th ed.). New York, NY: Routledge.
Torges, C.M., Stewart, A.J., & Duncan, L.E. (2008). Achieving ego integrity: Personality development in late midlife. Journal of Research in Personality, 42(4), 1004-1019. doi:10.1016/j.jrp.2008.02.006
Recommended Readings
Calhoun, H., & McEvatt, L. (2005). Urban black women at midlife: A counseling perspective. Journal of Women and Aging, 17(4), 43-57. doi:10.1300/J074v17n04_04
Goldstein, E.G. (2005). Chapters 1-4. In When the bubble bursts: Clinical perspectives on midlife issues. Hillsdale, NJ: Analytic Press
Raphael, D. (2011). Poverty in childhood and adverse health outcomes in adulthood. Maturitas, 69(1), 22-26. doi:10.1016/j.maturitas.2011.02.011
Week 10 Middle Adulthood – Development in the Social Environment
There are various social factors that can affect middle-aged adults. The readings for this lesson address issues related to family such as divorce and remarriage, life-work balance, and the experiences of immigrant populations during this crucial period of development.
Describe the social environmental issues that impact middle adulthood.
Identify issues that may arise within family systems.
Describe and contextualize the meaning of work/life balance.
Required Readings
Ahrons, C. (2016). Divorce: An unscheduled family transition. In B. Carter & M. McGoldrick (Eds.), The expanded family life cycle: Individual, family and social perspectives (pp. 381-398). Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon.
Bianchi, S. M. & Milkie, M. A. (2010). Work and family research in the first decade of the 21st century. Journal of Marriage and Family, 72(3), 705-725. doi: 10.1111/j.1741-3737.2010.00726.x
Im, E., Chang, S.J., Chee, W., Cee, E., & Mao, J.J. (2014). Immigration transition and depressive symptoms: Four major ethnic groups of midlife women in the United States. Health Care for Women International, 36(4), 439-456. doi: 10.1080/07399332.2014.924518
Pope, N.D., Kolomer, S., Glass, A.P. (2012). How women in late midlife become caregivers for their aging parents. Journal of Women and Aging, 24(3), 242-261. doi: 10.1080/08952841.2012.639676
Sumter, S. R., Valkenbur, P. M., & Peter, J. (2013). Perceptions of love across the lifespan: Differences in passion, intimacy, and commitment. International Journal of Behavior Development, 37(5), 417-427. doi:10.1177/0165025413492486
Recommended Readings
George, M. (2012). Migration traumatic experiences and refugee distress: Implications for social work practice. Clinical Social Work Journal 40(4), 429-437.doi: 10.1007/s10615012-0397-y –
Jang, S.J. & Zippay, A. (2011). The juggling act: Managing work-life conflict and work-life balance. Families in Society, 92(1), 84-90.doi: 10.1606/1044-3894.4061
Myers, J.E. & Harper M.C. (2014). Midlife concerns and caregiving experiences: Intersecting life issues affecting mental health. In R. C. Talley, G. L. Fricchione, & B. G. Druss (Eds.), The challenges of mental health caregiving: Research, Practice Policy. (pp. 123-142). New York, NY: Springer
Sternberg, R.M. & Lee, K.A. (2013). Depressive symptoms of midlife Latinas: Effect of immigration and sociodemographic factors. International Journal of Women’s Health, 5, 201-310. doi:10.2147/ijwh.s43132