Statistical procedures allow the researcher to share a large amount of information

Statistical procedures allow the researcher to share a large amount of information in a condensed format ranging from the simple, such as a frequency table that represents the number of times a response is given, to the more complex, such as a test of significance that determines if the difference between two groups is statistically significant. Qualitative data analysis, on the other hand, is based on the researcher analyzing and integrating the personal knowledge of the social context where the data was collected. The emphasis is on sense making, rather than explanation.
This week will begin to address how data is analyzed once it has been collected. Chapter 13 covers qualitative analysis. Chapter 14 covers descriptive statistics. Keep in mind that these methods “describe” what the data look like but don’t allow you to make any generalizations from your sample data to the population. Chapter 15 covers statistical analyses that do allow you to make these generalizations, known as inferential statistics. Those with qualitative research plans should pay close attention to Chapter 13, while those doing quantitative research design may pull from Chapters 14 and 15 depending on the study design.
This information is new to many of you, so patience with reading the material is necessary in order to grasp the new concepts presented. The Statistical Analysis by Design cheat sheet, textbook readings, and PowerPoint presentations present the main ideas in several different ways in order to help you to understand the material.
Post Discussion: Field Notes and Coding
While not everyone is doing qualitative research for their research plan, it is worth engaging in one of the most common ways to collect data in qualitative research since all of us engage in observation and try to make sense of these observations. One of the most common ways to collect data in qualitative research is to gather field notes about a phenomenon under study.
Using the video Jigsaw (Reading Rockets, 2012), create field notes that document your observations about the learning and interactions in the video. Use the provided t-chart ( T-chart for Field Notes T-chart for Field Notes – Alternative Formats ) to document your field notes. The first minute or two is about the jigsaw structure (you don’t need to have notes on the overview piece). Begin taking notes when the teacher in the video gives directions to students working in various group formats. The total length of the film is about nine and a half minutes.
After completing your field notes while watching the video clip, review the notes and make some initial attempts at coding for patterns and ideas that are present in the notes. Make sure you are coding the observations side of your t-chart notes, as this is the raw data you generated from viewing the video clip. See the Pell Institute Website on steps in coding.
As you code your notes, identify ideas that appear repeatedly. The easiest way to indicate these is to highlight them in different colors, and then define what each color code means. For example, if you highlight the words “behavior,” “kid out of seat,” and “kids talking out of turn,” you would indicate that these comments all fit under the code of “classroom management.” Provide the list of how you have organized your codes so that others can understand your thinking.
Post your coded field notes to the discussion board by Monday.
Support your statements with evidence from the required studies and your research.
Bhattacherjee, A. (2012). Social science research: Principles, methods, and practices. Global Text Project.
Chapter 13: Qualitative Analysis
Chapter 14: Quantitative Analysis: Descriptive Statistics
Chapter 15: Quantitative Analysis: Inferential Statistics

http://toolkit.pellinstitute.org/evaluation-guide/analyze/analyze-qualitative-data/#:~:text=Qualitativedataanalysisinvolvesthe,theresearchquestionsathand.
EDUC 594: Research Evaluation & Design
Week 6: Field notes and coding activity
T-Chart for Field Notes
One of the most common ways to collect data in qualitative research is to gather field notes about a phenomenon under study. Using the video called “Jigsaw,” create field notes that document your observations about the learning and interactions in the video. Use the provided t-chart for documenting your field notes. The first minute or two is about the jigsaw structure (you don’t need to have notes on the overview piece) but you will then see the teacher give directions to students working in various group formats and can begin your notes then. The total length of the film is about 9:30 minutes.
After completing your field notes while watching the video clip, review the notes and make some initial attempts at coding for patterns and ideas that are present in the notes. See pg. 297-300 for further information on coding and an example of coded field notes.
Post your coded field notes to the discussion board by Wednesday.
Observation
Reflection on what I observed: (this can include feelings, thoughts, questions for further consideration, etc.)
Example: Student turned and walked from the classroom without speaking to anyone
I was surprised by how quietly he left the room and no one seemed to notice. I wonder if this is a standing practice that this student has with the teacher; any safety concerns here?