We are studying this survey https://forms.office.com/pages/designpagev2.aspx?token=a64095a484fc48668915af982ec82bca&subpage=design&id=GiZxC19JqU6ZEdqES5QC73YP4NwF6TNLiXPPc7WbtIRUN1pLMkFGS1ZGOEhWU1U0MUJBWUlZSVRPSi4u&analysis=true Page 1: Abstract (do not write

We are studying this survey
https://forms.office.com/pages/designpagev2.aspx?token=a64095a484fc48668915af982ec82bca&subpage=design&id=GiZxC19JqU6ZEdqES5QC73YP4NwF6TNLiXPPc7WbtIRUN1pLMkFGS1ZGOEhWU1U0MUJBWUlZSVRPSi4u&analysis=true
Page 1: Abstract  (do not write the study’s title on this page, only Abstract.)
Summarizes the research. See Chapter XI. Presenting Your Research 
Contents include:  
This will be the last part of the research paper to complete. 
Summary of research conducted; 150-200 words or less.
Motivation or Purpose: State why the subject is essential or why anyone should care about the experiment and its results.
Problem: State the experiment’s hypothesis or describe the problem you are trying to solve.
Method: How did you test the hypothesis or try to solve the problem?
Results: What was the outcome of the study? Did you support or reject a hypothesis? Did you solve the problem? How close were the results to what you expected? State-specific numbers.
Include tables and graphs most pertinent to the study’s results/findings.
Additional tables and graphs such as participant demographic summary and each question from the psychometric with participant’s mean and standard deviations scores are included in the indexes. 
Conclusions: What is the significance of your findings? Do the results lead to an increase in knowledge, a solution that may be applied to other problems, etc.?
Introduction: Starts on Page 2 and Will End on Pages 3 or 4: (do not write the word Introduction, use the study’s title instead.)
Describes previous research and the rationale for the current study. 
See Chapter XI. Presenting Your Research 
Examples of Writing an Introduction for a Scientific Paper Download Writing an Introduction for a Scientific Paper
How Will Introductions be Evaluated? Rubric for introduction
Contents include:
No less than three pages and no more than four full pages of writing focused on the IV and DV and any supporting variables.
With the use of a minimum of 7 research articles (that’s just for the intro!) 
Statement of the Problem/Purpose of Conducting Research
Conceptual definitions of the IV and DV
Additional supporting variables (e.g., self-concept, sex differences, aging, brain development, positive psychology, developmental theories, protective factors, and more!) 
Current and most relevant studies conducted using the IV and DV 
Please Note: Articles used do not have exactly match both the IV and DV in your study’s. But they should match at least one. 
Some articles will highlight one or the other.
You may get lucky and find a study investigating the same IV and DV as your study. But chances are you will not! 
Method: Starts on Pages 4 or 5 (no min or max page requirement):
 Describe how the study was conducted. See Chapter XI. Presenting Your Research 
Contents include: 
Sample
Procedure
Measurement
With no less than one research article for the DV. 
Remember that the DV is the measurement/psychometric.
Results: Typically Starts on Pages 5 or 6 (no min or max page requirement): 
Describe the results of the study. See Chapter XI. Presenting Your Research 
Contents include: 
Both Descriptive and Inferential Statistics
Demographic and Participant Response Results 
Results of Statistical Analysis 
Tables and Graphs (must consist of both tables and graphs, and no less than three total.  
The most notable data and results are presented in tables and graphs and are included in the results section. 
The less notable data and results are presented in tables and graphs but are listed in the indices page(s) that proceeds with the References page(s).
Discussion: Typically Starts on Pages 7 or 8 and Will End on Pages 9. 
Describe the results of the study. See Chapter XI. Presenting Your Research 
No less than one full page and no more than two full pages of writing focused on explaining the study’s outcomes. 
Contents include: 
Findings
Research implications 
Research limitations
Conclusions 
References: Typically Starts on Page 10 or 11 (no min or max page requirement): 
Lists the references cited throughout the article. See Chapter XI. Presenting Your Research 
Contents include: 
Citations for ALL references utilized and that make up the entirety of the research study 
Research articles used in the Introduction section
Theories used in the Introduction section.
Textbook chapters used in the Introduction section
Reports used in the Introduction section.
Surveys/measurement (psychometrics) that were used in the Methods and Results sections
Replicated psychometrics (valid and reliable measure;  e.g., translated to another language and applied to another group)
Index: Typically Starts on Pages 11 or 12 (no min or max page requirement): 
List data and results tables and graphs referred to and explained in the Results section in the index. 
Besure to label (name) each table and graph by title and number order.
There is no exact way to name tables and graphs. Yet, keep in mind the following; 
 The names used must be clear and correspond to the information presented in the table and graphs.
 Names used must be easily distinguishable from other titles.
E.g., Table 2.1: Participant’s Singular Responses, Table 2.2: Participants Response Total
Formatting guidelines, assistance, and examples of tables and graphs can be found at the APA website linked HERE (Links to an external site.).